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Articles Tagged:

amp

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Google shares control of AMP with the development community

Accelerated Mobile Pages, or AMP for short, has been a controversial project at Google since it was initially announced. The lack of any opt-out mechanism, poor cross-browser compatibility, and Google's de-prioritization of AMP-less sites in search results are all major problems. However, the platform might improve in the coming months, as AMP will no longer be fully under Google's control.

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Opinion: Google AMP is still confusing, and it's not getting any better

The mobile web can be frustrating. Smartphones and tablets are becoming faster every year, but modern sites usually outpace them by becoming more complicated. While there are efforts to improve site load times, smartphones have to deal with other obstacles as well. Cellular network connections can become congested, especially in densely-populated areas, and budget phones often aren't speedy enough for a good browsing experience.

There have been many different products and technologies designed to speed up mobile browsing. Some browsers, like Opera Mini and Amazon Silk, render most of the page on a server and send the result to the user's device.

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AMP Stories make news articles on Google Search more interactive

Google launched the AMP Project (Accelerated Mobile Pages) back in 2015 in an attempt to speed up the mobile web. It's had its share of teething problems, but it's mostly been a success with its implementation in Search and the Google Feed. Last summer, it was reported that Google was working on "Stamp," which would combine AMP pages with an interactive storytelling element. That project has now come to fruition, with the announcement of AMP Stories.

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Google is finally fixing URLs on AMP pages

Even if you've never heard of AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages), you've probably already come across them several times online without realizing it — and you might have even been put off by one of its minor annoyances. The AMP project was created by Google in 2016 as yet another initiative to make online browsing faster and more responsive. Put simply, it works by making an educated guess on which pages a user is likely to visit next and begin preloading them before they do — for example, by preloading the first Google Search links in the background. I guess you could liken it to a sort of speculative execution for webpages, minus the Earth-shattering security vulnerabilities.

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Google is reportedly working on "Stamp," an AMP-powered Snapchat Discover clone

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Google has approached some publishers to participate in a new project allegedly called "Stamp," a portmanteau of "Stories" and their existing AMP service. The new "Stories" would be units of visually-oriented news, comprised of a series of slides including text, photos, and video. If that sounds a lot like Snapchat's Discover or Facebook's Instant Articles, you'd be right.

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Google Feed now displays Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) links

Back in February of last year, Google unveiled Accelerated Mobile Pages - or AMP, for short. In a nutshell, sites can choose to generate AMP versions of their pages (with an automated tool or site plugin), which load extremely quick compared to normal sites. This is due to various restrictions, compression on the included images/video, and caching by Google's own servers.

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Google is trying to make AMP pages less confusing, will change how links are handled

Google's Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) project is a decent idea, with not-so-great execution. AMP pages are designed to be extremely lightweight and load almost instantly, as a solution to mobile web sites being generally terrible. Sites have to opt-in to generating AMP pages of all existing pages, which Google then caches on its own servers for faster loading.

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Support for AMP links rolling out in the Google+ Android app

If you're not familiar, Google's Accelerated Mobile Pages project aims to make the mobile web faster and less data-heavy. Websites that choose to support it offer AMP versions of their pages, which are then loaded instead of the full site. Google mobile search and the mobile Google+ site already load AMP pages when available, and now the latter's native Android app is joining in.

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Google+ on mobile browsers now supports super-fast AMP links

The Accelerated Mobile Pages standard is slowly proliferating across the web, to the delight of users on metered or slow connections. The "AMP" sites, implemented for large media outlets at the moment, dynamically reformat pages to shrink images, improve readability, and bring load times down to just a second or two even on a slow mobile network. The latest service to get access to the tool is the web-accessible version of Google+. Users on mobile Chrome and other browsers should start seeing the lightning bolt icons for AMP stories (in the lower left of the image above) starting now.

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Google News & Weather 2.8 adds Lite mode, optimizes pages for slow connections

Google News & Weather has an interesting history. After years of being included on Android devices with almost no changes, it moved to the Play Store and received a Material Design facelift in 2014. Now Google has added a 'Lite mode' to the application, designed to save bandwidth for users in India and other regions where data is at a premium.

As indicated in the screenshot, you can set Lite mode to activate automatically, or force it on or off. When Lite mode is on, the application won't load as many images on the main screen. More importantly, opening a link in Lite mode causes an optimized version of the page to load instead of the full content.

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