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11

Verizon caught lying about its 5G coverage in ads

Verizon caught lying about its 5G coverage in ads

Verizon has agreed to pull advertisements that falsely imply its tiny 5G network is available nationwide. Two TV ads have been criticized by the National Advertising Division (NAD) of the BBB National Programs, the non-profit focused on industry-self regulation. The commercials in question were challenged by AT&T, which hasn't always been honest about 5G itself, advertising its "5Ge" network that's nothing but plain ol' 4G.

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91

How to block spam notifications and rogue ads on Android

How to block spam notifications and rogue ads on Android

Many mobile apps and games include advertisements, which is perfectly fine (developers have to eat, too), but some applications go a step further. Some apps and sites like to push notifications containing advertisements, and particularly-malicious applications might take over your entire screen when you don't even have the app open.

If you're dealing with annoying spam notifications or full-screen popups, you've come to the right place. This guide will help you track down where the ads (or other unwanted content) are coming from, so you can uninstall the app(s) responsible. If you're receiving lots of notifications from your web browser, we'll show you how to manage them.

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40

Mozilla launches Firefox Better Web extension powered by Scroll's ad-free subscription service

Mozilla launches Firefox Better Web extension powered by Scroll's ad-free subscription service

For digital publishers like Android Police, online ads provide a vital stream of revenue that helps us keep the lights on, despite taking up extra bandwidth for our readers and forcing content to load at a slower pace. Luckily, companies like Scroll have been working to disrupt the online ad industry, and they've reached an exciting new chapter in their journey. Mozilla is rolling out a very special extension for the Firefox browser — Firefox Better Web Beta — with Scroll baked in, and you can try it out today.

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33

Ad-free news subscription Scroll now hides unsightly toolbar by default (Update: AMP dark mode)

Ad-free news subscription Scroll now hides unsightly toolbar by default (Update: AMP dark mode)

If you haven't heard of Scroll by now (where have you been?), it's this nifty service that removes ads from 300 of your favorite news sites, including Android Police. Although the service is quite young, its developers have been quick to implement changes that readers have been begging for. In the latest update, the unsightly Scroll bar along the bottom edge of the app is no longer activated by default while reading content.

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7

Cookies Must Die is a free-to-play platformer that's actually worth playing

Cookies Must Die is a free-to-play platformer that's actually worth playing

Cookies Must Die is the latest release from Rebel Twins, the creators of Daddy Was A Thief, Aliens Drive Me Crazy, and most notably, Dragon Hills. As expected, Cookies Must Die offers a zany story, beautiful 2D art, and quality controls, though this is a free-to-play release, so the title's monetization isn't the best, but it is at least reasonably tolerable thanks to title's polished gameplay.

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231

New Scroll subscription service removes ads from over 300 news sites, including Android Police

New Scroll subscription service removes ads from over 300 news sites, including Android Police

A new subscription service called Scroll launches today, offering advertisement-free access to over 300 sites, including The Atlantic, BuzzFeed News, Gizmodo, The Verge, and even us: Android Police. Eventually, it will run you $5 a month, but you can try it out for the next thirty days for free, and those that sign up early get a 50% discount on their first six months of service.

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32

Your WhatsApp Status feed will remain free of ads, for now

Your WhatsApp Status feed will remain free of ads, for now

According to a report by The Wall Street Journal, Facebook has halted its plans to introduce ads in WhatsApp's Status feed. Talk of advertisements in WhatsApp, and specifically interspersed among ephemeral statuses, has been going for over a year, with the service's VP confirming that in October of 2018. But those plans seem to be paused, for now at least.

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45

Realme copies a little too much from Redmi, puts ads on its phones

Realme copies a little too much from Redmi, puts ads on its phones

Some folks see the Chinese budget brand Realme, a BBK subsidiary and OPPO spin-off, as something of a Xiaomi/Redmi clone — even just the names share more than chance would allow. Whether they are or aren't, true to that badge, they're set to ape one unappreciated feature from those devices: ads built right into the OS. At least you can turn them off if you want to (for now).

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39

Apex Launcher's demise continues, now pushes scammy ads for its own browser when you open Chrome

Apex Launcher's demise continues, now pushes scammy ads for its own browser when you open Chrome

Apex and Nova used to go toe to toe for launcher supremacy, but while Nova has continued to improve, Apex's fall from grace has been something of a spectacle. Last year's update to version 4 was met with criticism from users, leading the developer to exercise a partial rollback to the previous release. Now the launcher is back in the spotlight with a scammy-looking popup that recommends its own Privacy Browser when launching Chrome from the app drawer.

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51

YouTube will disable comments and personalized ads on children's content in wake of FTC fine

YouTube will disable comments and personalized ads on children's content in wake of FTC fine

Google (via YouTube) is rolling out new protections in the coming months for children using the video-streaming platform in the wake of the recent $170 million FTC settlement. As part of that change, personalized ads and comments on children's content will be eliminated, data collection for viewers of children's content will be reduced to the bare minimum required to "support the operation of the service," and content creators will be required to tag children's content as such.

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