Android Police

Reviews

26

Razer Kishi review: This is probably the best way to play games on your phone — if you can afford it

As phones get more powerful, mobile games get more complex: Snake and Brick Breaker have given way to fully-featured PC and console ports, to say nothing of cloud gaming. A lot of these games require a controller to fully enjoy, but mobile gamepads are generally clunky things. Enter Razer's newest controller: the Kishi attaches to phones of many different sizes to turn them into sleek portable consoles. It's really cool — but it's also really expensive, and it doesn't fit some of the most premium devices available today.

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18

Lenovo IdeaPad Flex 5 review: So close to the perfect 13-inch Chromebook

Lenovo might not have the greatest track record with its Windows-based laptops, but the company's Chromebooks have usually been excellent. The Lenovo C330 from 2018 was our top pick for a budget Chromebook, and more recently, we gave the Lenovo Chromebook Duet an 8/10.

This time around, we're taking a look at the Lenovo IdeaPad Flex 5, a budget 13-inch Chromebook that ranges in price from $360-410. There's a lot to like about the Flex 5, but one or two flaws keep me from whole-hardheartedly recommending it to everyone.

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590

iPhone SE 2020 review, one month later: Not even iOS can ruin such a great phone

We're the Android Police, and Google's mobile operating system is our raison d'être, our bread and butter, the most essential and integral part of our site's very existence. Still, it doesn't exist in isolation. Apple's iPhones continue to dominate the US market, and the new iPhone SE might have some of us wondering if the grass is any greener with iOS these days. That's subjective, and I can't really answer that for you. But I can say that the 2020 version of the iPhone SE pushes its $400 price tag further than any mid-range Android phone, and in the last month, I've grown to appreciate its value even more — though coming from Android, it is a dysfunctional relationship.

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57

Hisense H8G Quantum Android TV review: A very good smart TV that's very hard to recommend

It's truly incredible just how good cheap TVs have gotten. Not that long ago, $500 wouldn't get you anything better than a bargain bin 40" screen with a laundry list of issues and terrible, vaseline-coated picture quality. But now it's hard to spend more than $1,000 unless you really have a reason to, and Hisense's H8G series is a great example of just how far your money can go. It's a pretty good lineup from 50" to 75", and they all come with Android TV built right in. But while I want to recommend the TV, it's ruined by a single deal-breaker: Video playback from streaming apps can stutter and freeze for long periods, which isn't acceptable at any price.

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2

Lenovo IdeaPad 3 Chromebook review: Cheap for a reason

The first Chromebooks were budget laptops, which made sense for a stripped-down OS. Over time, Chrome OS has gotten (somewhat) more capable, and OEMs have paired it with premium hardware. The Pixelbooks and Galaxy Chromebooks of the world have their fans, but most Chromebooks are much more modest. However, few are as modest as Lenovo's $250 Ideapad 3 14-inch Chromebook. It sports a Celeron CPU, 4GB of RAM, and a 14-inch 1366 x 768 LCD. This Chromebook gets the job done—the performance is acceptable though not impressive, and it has a passable keyboard. The fuzzy, dim screen is the biggest problem, but even that I can partially forgive at this price point.

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3

Audio-Technica ATH-ANC300TW earbuds review: Exceptional sound, questionable value

Audio-Technica's been making audio equipment for almost 60 years. In that time, it's earned a reputation for making great, no-nonsense headphones. Its newest true wireless earbuds, the ATH-ANC300TW, play to the company's strengths: they're straightforward and sound incredible. But they're also simple to a fault, failing to offer high-tech features I've come to expect in premium true wireless sets — and that makes the prospect of spending $230 on them dubious.

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270

Pixel Buds 2 review, one month later: Too many compromises

It's been a month and change since Google launched its first true wireless earbuds. When I first got my hands on the Pixel Buds, I was struck by their fit and finish, comfort, and sound quality, but nagging problems like audible interference at low volumes and short battery life left me feeling lukewarm on the whole. I've been using them regularly ever since, but unfortunately, my opinion hasn't changed: there are too many compromises in the 2020 Pixel Buds to justify their price for most buyers.

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75

Motorola Edge+ review, one month later: Improving, but slowly

Motorola was at the forefront of cell phones for decades, but it never quite found its footing in the smartphone era. Early hits like the original Droid and Droid X bring nostalgia, but are also a brutal reminder: Motorola hasn't really made a standout smartphone in almost a decade, unless you count budget phones like the Moto X and G series. Cut to 2020—it's been several years since Motorola even made a flagship phone, and after the disaster that were Moto Mods, it's taking a real risk with the 5G-equipped, Verizon-exclusive Edge+.

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3

Marshall Monitor II A.N.C. review: Aggressive, confident styling with some key functional upgrades

Marshall's been a familiar name in music hardware for decades now, and while we're always going to think about amplifiers first and foremost, over the past few years we've seen the brand spread to a new line of consumer audio gear. That's included plenty of smart speakers, headphones, and even one really weird smartphone with two audio jacks. Today I'm checking out an updated version of the wireless Monitor Bluetooth headphones, the new Marshall Monitor II A.N.C.

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25

Walmart Onn 8 Pro review: Just buy a Fire tablet instead

Walmart released two tablets under its 'Onn' tech brand last year, the Onn 8 and Onn 10. We reviewed the smaller model, and for $65, it wasn't a bad device at all. Unlike Amazon's Fire tablets, which use a heavily-modified build of Android with only Amazon's own app store, the Onn 8 shipped with the Play Store and clean Android 9 Pie.

This year, Walmart is going for a slightly higher-end experience with its new Onn 8 Pro and Onn 10 Pro tablets. The prices have gone up a bit ($99 and $129, respectively), but in exchange, the models now offer slightly better hardware, Android 10, and USB Type-C connectivity.

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