Android Police

Google Home

10

Get two Google Homes and a Nest Mini for an insanely low $99 ($148 off)

Being quarantined might make you realize you're missing a couple of smart speakers at home. Whether you want to set up a new infrastructure or extend the existing one, this insane deal lets you grab three speakers for just $99. The package includes two Google Homes, as well as a free Nest Mini, which would typically cost $247 when sold separately.

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9

Bahasa Indonesia and Thai now supported on Google Home, Nest speakers (Update: Nest Mini launch)

Google Assistant has supported the Indonesian language on phones and TVs since March 2018, but since not all Assistant devices are created equal for languages and features, that meant smart speakers were left out of the loop. That's changing now.

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16

Google Assistant finally supports sensors and smoke detectors, paving the way for smarter alerts and automations

One of the cornerstones of the smart home are automations that get triggered based on certain conditions. SmartThings, Wink, and other hubs built their whole proposition on top of that, but then voice assistants came and shook that foundation. Voice commands, and thus active requests, became the focus, but that didn't stop everyone from bemoaning the loss of passive automations. To implemented that functionality you need sensors, and Google Assistant is finally adding native support for them.

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27

The new Google Assistant bugs out when you try to start a routine from the Home app

Despite launching with the Pixel 4 several months ago, the new Google Assistant still carries many restrictions, which make it practically unavailable for the grand majority of Android users. This limitation is a good thing, though, because it gives Google time to iron out bugs like the one we'll describe below: The Google Home app fails to start a routine if you're using this new Assistant.

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45

Google finally acknowledges Bluetooth disconnection issue on Home speakers

For most of us, Google Homes are Assistant and cast speakers first: We either ask for music or audio to be played or we use them like a Chromecast target from our phones. But that's discounting two other ways they can be used: as Bluetooth speakers and as source to stream to other Bluetooth speakers. For more than a year now, that functionality has been broken and Google Homes haven't been able to maintain a Bluetooth link without disconnecting, but the Mountain View giant has finally acknowledged the issue.

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35

You can now broadcast messages to a single Google or Nest Home

It's been more than a couple of years since Google added a broadcast functionality to its Home speakers, but throughout all this time, it's been an all-or-nothing approach. You could either send the message to all speakers in a home or none at all. Now, it seems that Google is rolling out an option to broadcast to a single speaker.

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46

Fix for Google Home preview program update issue that broke some speakers rolling out (Updated)

Over the last three days, there have been widespread reports of Google Home smart speakers becoming entirely unresponsive. Most of those affected appear to be in the Google Home preview program, which allows the adventurous to test early firmware releases. While a factory reset has fixed the issue for some, for others, it reportedly makes things worse, rendering the device no longer discoverable.

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6

This $45 Google Home deal is the perfect excuse to pick up another smart speaker

Google's original Home speaker has gone without a hardware refresh in the three years and change since its release, and honestly, that's okay — it still does everything it needs to do just fine. If you're looking to get your hands on a second (or third, or fourth...), there's never been a better time: you can pick one up for just $45 today at GameStop.

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12

Guest Mode disappears from Google Home speakers, remains available on Chromecasts for now

Guest mode is one of the Chromecast's relatively unknown but very handy features. It uses location proximity and WiFi availability to allow guests to cast content to your speakers or TVs without logging in to your WiFi network, provided they have the specific PIN code for that device. Whether you're throwing a party or have temporary visitors and you don't want to bother with sharing WiFi access, you can simply give them a 4-digit code and let them choose the media that gets played. The feature launched in December of 2014 on Chromecasts and carried over to Google Homes — because they're essentially cast targets.

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