Android Police

News

7

Samsung's new AltZLife features for A71 and A51 are 'the ultimate private mode'

Samsung is launching a new "Made for India" feature (or set of features) called AltZLife, that lets you switch between two different phone profiles — including duplicated apps that can be associated with different accounts — with a quick and simple double-press of the power button, called Quick Switch. A new on-device AI feature named Content Suggestions will also recommend when certain images might be better moved into your private gallery in the Secure Folder. ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

Read More
1

OxygenOS 10.5.4 for the OnePlus Nord delivers camera and display improvements

The OnePlus Nord hasn't even been out for two weeks, but it's now receiving its second update. This one is OxygenOS 10.5.4; it's not a major update by any means, but it does bring some optimizations to the cameras and the display. It also has some small bug fixes.

Read More
11

TikTok may take legal action against US ban

TikTok’s US ban came on the heels of similar restrictions in India — two of its biggest overseas markets with hundreds of millions of users. But unlike India’s immediate ban, the US administration has given the Chinese social media app a grace period lasting until September 20 — incidentally around when Microsoft is expected to close its acquisition deal. But before that happens, TikTok is reportedly planning to sue the federal government over its approaching ban within the week.

Read More
4

Google Fit now details pace per mile, helping you better judge your running performance (APK download)

Google Fit helps you keep an eye on your fitness, be it via a smartwatch or just via your phone's own sensors. To make it even easier to parse how you did during your latest run, the company has added a pace per mile/km bar graph to a workout's details. The disappearing and re-appearing elevation map has also returned for some with this release, though not for everyone.

Read More
59

Pixel 4a vs. Pixel 3a: What's new in Google's 2020 budget phone?

The Pixel 3a was our phone of the year in 2019, and for a lot of very good reasons. At $400, it offered a camera experience that many phones costing twice as much couldn't, and an update policy no other Android OEM could match. With the Pixel 4a, then, Google had a lot to live up to, and we weren't sure they could outdo the 3a without compromising on price (and you should read our review of it). It turns out, we were wrong: the 4a makes a few notable changes to the formula Google introduced with the 3a, but their collective impact results in an objectively better smartphone at a lower price.

Read More
41

Galaxy Note20 and Note20 Ultra hands-on: High end, high fashion, high price

Samsung's first "Ultra" phone, the Galaxy S20 Ultra, received at best a lukewarm critical reception. Consumers didn't seem to respond, either, as sales figures have not been strong. And while some of that boils down to trying to sell an extremely expensive phone during a global economic and health catastrophe, a lot of it was just down to what you got for the money. Samsung banked big on cameras a key selling point for the S20 Ultra, and they simply weren’t up to scratch. There’s a lot riding on the Galaxy Note20 series to redeem that phone, and the Note20 Ultra in particular.

Read More
61

Samsung Galaxy Tab S7+ hands-on: Android's never had a tablet this good

Android tablets have always been a bit awkward, as products. With the platform lacking the huge ecosystem of tablet-optimized apps that the iPad enjoys, or the large desktop legacy world you can access on something like a Surface Pro, many have asked the question "Why?" when it comes to an Android-powered slate. Perhaps it's not really one worth asking, though, when a company as large as Samsung is bothering to introduce an $850 tablet at all. With the Tab S7 and S7+, Samsung is bringing a capital-P "Premium" tablet hardware experience, and we've spent the last few days using the latter.

Read More
236

The Pixel 5 might have a lower-end chipset, but we're not worried, and here's why

There's now ample evidence that Google will use a Snapdragon 765G chip in the anticipated Pixel 5, something that's raised more than a few eyebrows into the phone's launch. All of Google's previous Pixel phones have used Qualcomm's high-end 800 series Snapdragon chips, and some are fearful that a switch to a less premium processor could mean taking a real performance hit. But we've been using several Snapdragon 765G-powered phones for the last few weeks — namely, the OnePlus Nord, Moto Edge, and Vivo X50 Pro — and, frankly, we're not worried.

Read More
43

Android TV is getting Instant Apps, Gboard updates, and PIN-based purchases

Android TV doesn't always feel like it's getting much attention, but the user base has grown substantially in recent history. According to Google, the number of active devices has grown by 80% in the last year, owed largely to adoption by seven out of the top ten smart TV manufacturers and set-top boxes from 160 TV service providers. With so many new users and a continually growing assortment of apps, Google is highlighting changes to the platform that will improve the experience for users and developers.

Read More
15

Google Pixel 4a vs Pixel 4 camera comparison: Is there a difference?

One of the delightful surprises that came with the Pixel 3a last year was its camera. Unlike so many smartphone manufacturers, Google didn't opt to somehow make the imaging experience on its budget phone worse: the photos it took were exactly like those shot on the premium Pixel 3 and 3 XL, phone costing twice as much. As a result, the 3a took photos better than many $1000 flagships. With the Pixel 4a, Google hasn't messed with that formula. The new budget Pixel snaps shots that look every bit like those from its far more expensive siblings, and will make anything this side of an iPhone 11 Pro jealous.

Read More
Mastodon