Android Police

Development

5

Google won’t suspend developers who fail to maintain unpublished apps, as previously feared

Play Store rules and policies have always been fluid and quick to change. Lately, Google has emphasized user security over usability. One instance is the crackdown on purported misuse of SMS and call permissions, making some developers rethink or remove basic functionality in their apps. A Reddit thread surfaced that suggested old, unpublished applications would also need to be updated, with emails and help documents seemingly implying that not addressing the issue could result in the suspension of developers' accounts. Thankfully this isn't the case, according to an Android Developer Relations spokesperson who joined the conversation.

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1

Google and Arm are developing a new technology to mitigate against memory vulnerabilities in Android

According to Google, more than half of the highest priority security vulnerabilities faced by Android 9 Pie have been due to memory safety bugs. New features in Android Q such as IntSan instrumentation are designed to mitigate against such problems, but there's only so much that can be achieved by software alone. Google has therefore teamed up with chip-maker Arm to develop a new hardware feature called the memory tagging extension (MTE).

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0

Registration now open for Android Dev Summit 2019

If you're an Android developer, and you missed your chance to go to Google I/O (or you're ready for round two), the Android Dev Summit is set for October 23rd and 24th of this year. The event was announced back in April, but now registration is officially open.

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71

Official Fuchsia developer site goes live

Google has been silently working on a new operating system called "Fuchsia" for years, with details, rumors, and wild speculation swirling through the blogosphere every time some new tidbit trickles out. Yesterday Google pushed up an official documentation site at fuchsia.dev, with instructions and details that can help developers play with the early operating system and its software. It appears to be the same info that was previously available at the Fuchsia Git, but with better formatting, and at a verifiably Google-owned domain (according to ICANN's WHOIS).

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57

Google shares how it designed dark theme for Photos, Calendar, News, and the upcoming Android Auto

Google has had dark themes in work for a long time, with YouTube being one of the first apps to receive an optional alternative design back in 2018, followed by a plethora of other Google apps. The company had also experimented with system-wide dark themes before, as Android 8.1 Oreo was the first version to come with limited automatic theming options based on your wallpaper, followed by a toggleable theme switcher in Pie. With the announcement of a proper dark mode in Android Q, Google now officially commits to supporting two themes, and with that, the company shared how its developers created the toned-down versions of their apps on Thursday.

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26

Gmail API changes are about to break apps like SwiftKey, SMS Backup+, and Nine

Over the last year, Google has been instituting sweeping changes when it comes to app permissions to help protect user privacy. It imposed new restrictions when it came to SMS and phone permissions, and plenty of app makers found themselves caught in the Google support machine. Now developers found in violation of recent Gmail API changes are left out in the lurch, and the list of affected apps includes SMS Backup+, Nine, and even SwiftKey.

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31

Google Assistant can directly control your smart mop

If you're using Google Assistant to control your smart mop, you probably have to tell it something like "OK Google, ask X to start mopping" or "Hey Google, tell X to clean." Even though this isn't too bad, it means you have to remember exact phrases and give your appliance's service name every time you want to operate your robot cleaner. However, Assistant is now gaining support for mops, which will let you control them directly using more natural commands.

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15

Scrypted is like Tasker for home automation, integrates with Google Home, Alexa, and HomeKit

There are a plethora of different home automation platforms like SmartThings, HomeKit, Wink, Amazon Alexa, Google Home, and many more. Some of them play together nicely, but once you're mixing and matching, you're going to end up with a bunch of apps and hubs to control all of your devices, and some features just won't work with the provided software. Koushik Dutta (or Koush), the developer of beloved tools like ClockworkMod, has run into these limitations. To overcome his issues, he simply created a smart home hub himself that allows users and developers to script their own actions to interconnect their devices, similar to Tasker.

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26

Android Studio will discontinue updates for 32-bit PCs this year

16 years after the first 64-bit x86 processor was released, the PC industry has been taking steps to move away from the older 32-bit architecture. Many popular games and applications are dropping support for 32-bit processors, and Google announced today that 32-bit machines will soon no longer receive Android Studio updates.

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3

Unofficial library brings Wear OS Tiles to third-party apps

Last month, Google unveiled a significant interface update for Wear OS: Tiles. On updated watches, you can swipe from the main watch face to access new screens with quickly-accessible information, like fitness goals and the current weather forecast. The company hasn't provided developers with a way to create their own Tiles, but legendary Wear OS developer Sterling Udell has now fixed that problem.

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