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149

DontKillMyApp.com shames OEMs that needlessly kill useful background processes to save battery life

DontKillMyApp.com shames OEMs that needlessly kill useful background processes to save battery life

The days when third-party battery-saving apps were necessary to hit a satisfactory number of hours off a single charge are long behind the vast majority of Android users, thanks to improvements like Doze and Adaptive Battery. But in some cases, this measure of progress has become something of a Pyrrhic victory, with useful background processes carelessly destroyed and developers taking the brunt of user ire. Well, the Urbandroid team — the gang behind apps Sleep As Android, Twilight, and others — doesn't plan on going quietly into the night. In fact, they're going on the offensive with a new informational website where the most flagrant OEM offenders are shamed and users and developers are educated.

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22

Paranoid Android announces Pie Beta ROMs, starting with Xiaomi Mi 8, Mi Mix 2S, and Poco F1

Paranoid Android announces Pie Beta ROMs, starting with Xiaomi Mi 8, Mi Mix 2S, and Poco F1

Popular custom ROM maker Paranoid Android came back from the dead in 2017 and has just announced its long-awaited first Android 9 Pie beta builds, with initial availability for a handful of Xiaomi devices. PA is also changing the way it develops its ROM to include Generic System Images (GSI) which should allow support for a greater number of devices.

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200

Google's new SMS and call permission policy is crippling apps used by millions

Google's new SMS and call permission policy is crippling apps used by millions

Late last year, Google decided it was time to crack down on apps requesting SMS and call log permissions. Ostensibly, exceptions would be granted for categories including backups and automation, but as of now, there are still gaps which cover legitimate use cases. While some popular apps like Tasker have successfully secured exemptions, others like Cerberus have not. Instead, they've decided to strip out those permissions or risk facing the wrath of Google's upcoming January 9th banhammer, killing associated functionality and disappointing millions of long-time users to adhere to the Play Store's new policy.

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17

[Update: Flag available in Chrome OS 72 Dev] Chromebooks and tablets will get an option to show the tablet-optimized version of a website

[Update: Flag available in Chrome OS 72 Dev] Chromebooks and tablets will get an option to show the tablet-optimized version of a website

Viewing the full web is one of the great parts of using a Chromebook, but sometimes the full web doesn't feel quite so full - especially if you're exploring it with a touchscreen. Much of the internet remains poorly-optimized for touch, and desktop websites are still, first and foremost, designed for point-and-click experiences. With the launch of the Pixel Slate, Google's senior product manager for Chrome OS, Kan Liu, confirmed to me in an interview that the company is aware that not all websites are going to be a great fit for a touchscreen.

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40

Google Play Services drops support for Android 4.0 ICS

Google Play Services drops support for Android 4.0 ICS

Android 4.0, nicknamed 'Ice Cream Sandwich,' was an exciting release. It brought all the improvements in Honeycomb back to smartphones, and for the first time ever, Android had a somewhat-cohesive visual style. However, those days have long since passed, with 4.0-4.0.4 now representing less than 0.5% of the overall Android install base.

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29

Google announces Flutter 1.0, the first stable release of its cross-platform mobile development toolkit

Google announces Flutter 1.0, the first stable release of its cross-platform mobile development toolkit

Yesterday, at a dev-focused event at the Science Museum in London, UK, Google announced the 1.0 release of its cross-platform portable UI toolkit. Flutter has been in development since in 2015 with several betas being going out in the last year and a preview release this summer. It will allow developers to build apps that seamlessly work on both Android and iOS without maintaining separate codebases.

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2

Razer Phone 2 factory images and kernel source are now available for download

Razer Phone 2 factory images and kernel source are now available for download

For many, a phone is a black box filled with apps, connectivity, and no small part of modern tech magic. But for the technically inclined (like enthusiasts and developers), the intricate operations that keep us knee-deep in apps and services are well understood, and access to specifics like kernel sources and factory images helps tremendously when it comes to rooting, ROMing, and device-targeted development. So it's a good thing Razer pushed out both factory images and kernel sources for its most recent flagship, the Razer Phone 2.

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7

[Update: XZ2 Compact too] Sony has added the Xperia XZ2 and XZ3 to its Open Devices program

[Update: XZ2 Compact too] Sony has added the Xperia XZ2 and XZ3 to its Open Devices program

For developers wishing to tinker with Sony phones, the Open Devices program is a welcome official point of entry. The Japanese company adds most of its high-profile Android handsets to the list of supported devices after a little while, and the Xperia XZ2 and XZ3 are the latest to join the ranks.

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4

Registration for Google's .dev domains begins January 2019

Registration for Google's .dev domains begins January 2019

As the number of available .com domains continues to decline, alternative domain endings are becoming more popular. Many developers (including yours truly) prefer to use .io domains for personal sites and projects, as a nod to "I/O" being the abbreviation for "input/output," but now Google is working on a new ending specifically for those people — .dev.

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28

Google could give more devices an early taste of Android Q with earlier GSI (Generic System Image) releases

Google could give more devices an early taste of Android Q with earlier GSI (Generic System Image) releases

Project Treble seems to be making a dent in the fight against Android's fragmentation problem, and one of the keys to its success relies on something called a GSI (Generic System Image) which is basically a super-stock, AOSP-based image of the Android framework, and a required part of testing Treble compliance. According to a talk at the Android Dev Summit last week, Google may give more devices an advance taste of later Android versions via an earlier GSI release schedule.

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