Android Police

Chrome

13

Google Chrome 78 has a redesigned long-press context menu

Google Chrome 78 has been rolling out to the stable channel over the last few days, and among improvements to local file management and automatic verification SMS pasting, we keep finding changes here and there. One of these is a redesigned context menu that flies towards you with a spiffy new animation when you long-press a link, image, or video. It has been available as a flag in one form or another for more than two years, but Chrome 78 seems to have activated it for most people.

Read More
5

Chrome Beta 79 enables WebXR API by default, opening door to more web-based AR/VR experiences

Chrome 78 has rolled out to all platforms, which means it's time for Chrome 79 to hit the Beta Channel. This update is definitely smaller in scope than the last few releases, but there are still a few interesting additions — especially if you're interested in VR/AR.

Read More
35

Chrome 78 allows sites to edit local files, read verification SMS texts, and more (Update: Critical security fix)

Chrome 77 has pretty much finished its rollout across desktop and mobile platforms, so v78 has moved up to the beta channel. This update is jam-packed with new capabilities for web sites, so let's dive right in!

Read More
41

YouTube Music on the web gets keyboard shortcuts and becomes a PWA

While almost all other music streaming services have long offered proper desktop applications (or an Electron app, at least), Google has always touted that websites are all you'll ever need. Still, it would sometimes be nice to have a dedicated window for music, including support for playback keyboard shortcuts. Google has finally budged, in a way, and is rolling out a progressive web app for desktops that offers these qualities.

Read More
64

[Update: System Webview release tracks] Android 10 no longer uses Chrome app to render in-app web content

The component of Android responsible for rendering web pages inside apps (login screens, simple browsers, etc.) is the WebView. It became a separately-updated component with Android 5 Lollipop, and then Chrome started to handle WebView entirely in Android 7 Nougat. Starting with Android 10, Chrome no longer serves as the system WebView... sort of.

Read More
9

Chrome might add drag-and-drop support for tabs to (and from) other browsers

Now that most browsers share the same Chromium base (yay monopolies!), there's potential for some synergy between them. One step in that direction could be sharing tabs between different browsers, according to a flag that recently appeared in Chrome Canary.

Read More
25

[Update: Security fixes too] Chrome 77 adds 'Send this page' feature, lets sites import contacts, and more

It has been about a month since Chrome 77 entered beta, and right on schedule, it has now graduated to the stable branch. This release doesn't have many groundbreaking changes on the surface, but there are still some new features worth mentioning. Without further ado, let's take a deep dive into Chrome 77!

Read More
5

Chrome is about to make the web much better for blind people

Google's machine learning wizardry is capable of more than just AR emoji. As proven by features like Live Relay, computational recognition of sound and images can lead to incredible quality-of-life improvements for people hard of hearing or sight. Google's newest trick? Chrome will soon add captions to every image on the web.

Read More
14

Chrome Canary gets tab thumbnail previews on desktop

Google is constantly working on improving and tweaking Chrome, and the best place to witness changes before they're finalized and ready for everyone is the developer preview version, Canary. One of the recent features to come to the browser on desktops is Tab Strips. When you activate the correct flags linked to it on v79, an extra button appears in the toolbar. It lets you enlarge the tab overview and see thumbnails of the websites you're browsing.

Read More
10

Chrome to block unsecure content from loading on HTTPS pages

HTTPS has largely replaced its less secure predecessor HTTP as the default choice for sending resources over the internet. The key difference between the two is that HTTPS transmits data using an encrypted connection, while data loaded over HTTP is not. Google began marking all sites still utilizing HTTP connections as 'Not Secure' with the release of Chrome 68 last year, and today, Google announced additional plans to inform users when sites utilize an insecure connection. With these latest changes, the Chrome team hopes to address the problem of mixed content.

Read More