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Chrome OS

21

Google Chrome and Chrome OS releases are paused due to coronavirus (Update: Unpaused)

For the past few years, a new Chrome release has occurred every six weeks, with changes coming to Chrome OS shortly afterward. However, the ongoing coronavirus outbreak has caused many companies to delay or scale back product releases, and it seems Chrome is no exception.

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7

8 Chrome extensions that help you stay productive on your Chromebook

A lot of people are starting to get accustomed to remote working, considering that many countries have mandated shutdowns and quarantines to battle the novel coronavirus. While working from home may be comfortable and fun at first, you need to have the right tools at your disposal to be efficient and stay productive. If you have a Chromebook, the best way to tailor your working experience to your needs is via browser extensions, and we've got a collection of eight great tools for you.

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7

Google introduces new 'Works with Chromebook' badge for supported accessories

Chromebooks generally work with a wide array of keyboards, mice, touchpads, gamepads, flash drives, and other accessories, thanks to the Linux kernel at the core of Chrome OS. However, there are still cases where it's not clear if a certain adapter or other accessory will work with Chromebooks, and that's what Google aims to address.

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11

The Files app on Chrome OS is getting a Material Design facelift

Google loves iterating on software design, but it often takes some time for its new ideas to trickle down to all its products. The refreshed Material Design principles visible in applications like Gmail are present in some parts of Chrome OS, but not others. That's changing soon, though, as the operating system's decidedly stale Files browser is getting a refresh.

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8

Chrome OS will soon have an app for managing print jobs

Printers are terrible, but in many circumstances, they are a necessary evil — especially in the offices and schools where Chromebooks have a stronghold. Chrome OS has been slowly expanding its support for printing over the past few years, as native printing (without Google Cloud Print) arrived in mid-2017, and last year's Chrome OS 78 update made further improvements. Now Google is preparing another key update: a print manager.

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9

Brydge cancels C-Touch trackpad for Chrome OS

Brydge announced a pair of made-for-Chrome OS accessories, the C-Type keyboard and C-Touch trackpad, forever ago. The keyboard has been available since last May, but the trackpad has been delayed repeatedly. Yesterday, Brydge confirmed that it's nixed its plans to release the pad at all.

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18

Chrome OS 80 improves tablet mode, adds APK sideloading, and updates Linux environment (Update: Rollout resumed)

Chrome OS updates always arrive a little later than Chrome browser updates, but Chrome OS 80 has been cooking in the oven for an especially long period of time — v81 of the browser is due soon. Still, good things come to those who wait, and Chrome OS 80 has a few noteworthy improvements.

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3

Chromebooks get PIP for Netflix, Ambient EQ coming to more devices

Picture-in-picture, or PIP, is easy to take for granted when the majority of services and devices have supported it for years. But for those of us using Chromebooks, that's not the case. Hardly any apps or services supported it at all until Google released a Chrome extension last January that allowed you to trigger PIP with a keyboard shortcut. It was a start, but having to activate it manually each time was a pain. Thankfully, PIP will now work as it does on Android if you're using Netflix.

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12

Chrome OS 81 redesigns Chrome tab UI for tablets

Google has gradually been improving the tablet experience on Chrome OS over the last few months, adding Android 10 inspired gesture navigation back in January. In Chrome OS 81, which has now entered into the Beta channel, Google continues that trend with a redesigned UI for Chrome tabs.

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67

How to turn your old, slow laptop into a sleek Chromebook

Chromebooks are known for their resourcefulness as Chrome OS often runs smooth as butter on the weakest possible configurations. While Google officially supports only a handful of devices that are custom-built to fit the OS, you'll be delighted to learn that it's possible to turn many old, slow laptops into fast Chrome OS machines. That's thanks to Neverware's CloudReady fork of Chromium OS, the open-source base of Google's commercial product. The company focuses on businesses and schools that want to refresh their old hardware, but it also offers a free version of CloudReady to private users.

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