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We found 113 results for 'sony lollipop'

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553

[Update: Nexus 6 LVY48C For Project Fi] [Flash All The Things] Android 5.1 OTA Roundup For Nexus And GPE Devices

Of our many jobs here at Android Police, one is to make our readers' lives easier when we can. With that in mind, here's a roundup of every known Android 5.1 OTA for every Nexus device that will be receiving it. As new ones become available, this post will be updated accordingly. Android 5.1 will be released to Nexus 4, 5, 6, 7 (2012 and 2013), 9, and 10. As I'm sure you've guessed, there will be plenty of files to be had.

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361

Nexus 9 vs. iPad Air 2: A [Mostly] Subjective Comparison

DISCLAIMER: I bought an iPad Air 2, and I bought said iPad Air 2 after owning the first iPad Air since launch day last year. I sold my iPad Air so I could do this. I really like my iPad Air 2, it's pretty great. I also really like Android. The following article contains my opinions, anecdotal evidence, subjective analysis thereof, and did I mention opinions? There are opinions. Also, this article is very long, so many sections just have side-by-sides of random Android vs iOS app comparisons presented without comment.
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281

New Year's Day Open Discussion: What Should 2016 Bring For Android (Software Or Hardware)?

It's new year's day! (Well, at least in most of the world, I know some of you have already flipped the calendar to the 2nd). And, as you might guess, news is just the littlest bit slow, especially with the first landing on a Friday. Everyone's out and about doing stuff, or whatever. As such, I felt it was a perfect time for a little chat.

2015 brought many new things to Android. Marshmallow is easily the most polished version of the OS yet. Android Auto has started to become available on vehicles. The Nexus 5X and 6P marked the first dual-release Nexus phones.

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259

[Weekend Poll] How Much Do You Expect To Pay For Your Next Smartphone?

The cost of smartphones on average, it's no secret, has generally been tumbling around the world in the last couple of years. With many OEMs scrambling to cram specification sheets at lower and lower prices, competition in the low end of the smartphone segment is hotter than ever.

This isn't always how it was, though - nor how it necessarily is in every country. Here in the good old US of A, for example, good cheap smartphones still remain a relative rarity aside from Motorola's Moto G and Moto E. This is a result of market conditions created by American cell phone carriers, who subsidize or finance (JUMP!, Next, Edge, etc.) the cost of devices in order to offset the sticker shock of, say, a nearly $1000 iPhone.

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233

Sony Is Trying To Push A Power Menu Restart Option To AOSP As A Developer Setting

Google has steadfastly refused to add a reboot option to the power menu in stock Android over the years. In fact, it removed everything other than "power off" from that menu in Lollipop. Users have been asking for a reboot option forever, and now Sony is asking for it too. Sony has opened a bug tracker issue and submitted a patch to add it, but Google does not appear to be biting.

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228

[Update: Moto 360] Android Wear 5.1 OTA Roundup

If you own an Android Wear device right now, chances are you're probably waiting patiently furiously checking for that elusive Android Wear 5.1 update. Well, we've got you covered. As the links to the OTA ZIP files become available, we will post them here. To flash these, you'll need to have ADB installed and have the Google USB drivers from the Android SDK. You'll reboot your watch into recovery mode, then select "Install Update From ADB." You can then run "adb sideload filename.zip" from a command prompt.

A Note About Flashing

You can only sideload an OTA update manually if you can actually connect your watch to a computer via USB, and even then, you may not be able to.

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212

LG G4 Review: Perhaps The Most Practically Appealing Of 2015's Flagship Phones

LG has developed something of a cult following in the smartphone enthusiast world since it introduced the G2 back in 2013. With the G3, it became the first major smartphone OEM to bring a QHD (2.5K) display, among the first to use the Snapdragon 801 processor, introduced a great camera with OIS, and generally built a fast, bleeding-edge phone.

The G4 could be seen as a largely corrective measure - mostly existing to improve on its predecessor's pitfalls. The G3's display was criticized as dull and lacking much in the way of brightness. The G4's has much better contrast, improved viewing angles, output, and uses less power.

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210

Android TV streaming boxes: An uneasy start and apparent death

Android TV is very much alive, as was made abundantly clear by the plethora of new Android TV powered televisions with Google Assistant capability shown off at CES 2018. Streaming boxes powered by Android TV, however, are conspicuously missing—the last Android TV set-top box to be released in the United States was the Xiaomi Mi Box in October 2016.

Apple TV and Amazon's Fire TV products both received hardware refreshes last September, while Roku products received hardware refreshes in October. In comparison, the three year old Nexus Player—arguably the flagship of Android TV—last received a software update in November, and will not be upgraded to Android 8.1 Oreo.

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200

[Weekend Poll & Discussion] Is Android TV Yet Another Living Room Flop For Google? Do You Have One?

When Android TV launched, it did so to an attitude that, at best, could be described as lukewarm. Google has attempted to corner the living room for years now, and its most successful attempt  - the Chromecast - has essentially undercut Google's own more ambitious TV products.

Google TV never really had a chance - it was slow, the hardware was never particularly powerful, and the remotes were a nightmare. Google eventually let GTV die by slowly letting it fade into uselessness piece by piece.

Chromecast actually launched before Google TV was really "dead" in any official sense, and its success was immediate.

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187

HTC One M9 Review: The Phone Only HTC Could Build... For The Third Time

HTC was one of Android's earliest supporters. When the Dream launched in 2009, little did HTC likely know that its fortunes would skyrocket in the few years after, along with its share of the smartphone market. Not long after, though, those fortunes began to wane - with the launch of the original One series (One X, S, V), HTC's first attempt to rebrand its smartphone design image began.

The One X was, and I still think is, a beautiful phone. While the Tegra version was lamentable, the Qualcomm-powered variants received generally wide praise. The next year, One M7 launched. It, too, was very good-looking, and while the Ultrapixel camera was controversial, the phone debuted to very positive reviews.

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