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1376

[Android Police Holiday Giveaway #2] Win One Of Twenty (Yes, 20) Awesome Android Phones From Sprint

Winners have been selected. Congrats to:
  • Adam M.
  • Jonathon G.
  • Jesus T.
  • Troy C.
  • Mohd F.
  • Mike S.
  • Dan Z.
  • Anthony F.
  • Travis F.
  • Steven D.
  • Rocco
  • TesterInOaks
  • Melanie T.
  • Geoff J.
  • Russell S.
  • Felipe P.
  • Dough K.
  • Jessica K.
  • Matthew R.
  • Juan C.

We'll be in touch with the winners shortly.

We started off Android Police's holiday giveaway series yesterday with some great phones and other gadgets from RadioShack - today we're upping the ante.

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484

This Is Volantis, HTC's Nine-Inch Nexus Tablet

With Android Silver rumors brewing, and LG's Ken Hong indicating that the manufacturer doesn't have a Nexus phone in the cards, the fate of the Nexus line as a whole has been sort of up in the air.

We don't have news about whether a Nexus phone exists, but we do have information related to HTC's Volantis (or Flounder), an 8.9" Nexus tablet. The information provided to us indicates possible specs, features, and pricing, as well as an early look at the form factor, though the images we have don't appear to be final renderings of the device.

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436

Galaxy S8 and S8+ review: Another pair of excellent mainstream smartphones from Samsung

When you talk about Samsung's Galaxy smartphones, it's hard not to talk about 'the average consumer.' Because the Galaxy S series is the second-most popular line of smartphones on earth, its audience is unashamedly mainstream, and the vast majority of sales of these devices will be to consumers who aren't what you'd call tech-savvy. The issue for Samsung, increasingly, is learning how to split the difference between a smartphone that provides a good experience for everybody and maintaining that all important credibility with its fans and enthusiasts.

The Galaxy S8 and S8+, for example, have Quad HD displays - the best ones I've ever seen.

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427

[Update: Full Casting Video With Sad (L)osers] Google Posts 'Sweeeeet' Video That Confirms Android 5.0

Rumor has it tomorrow is a big day for the Android world. Of course officially, Google hasn't made a peep about potential new devices, their announcement date, or Android's upcoming L incarnation, but we've heard plenty about the Nexus 6, Nexus 9 (and its accessories), and L itself.

Sundar Pichai, however, has shared a video clearly meant to tease the Android community (already stirred to a fever pitch) at least one more time, following the story of the L casting call, where various desserts audition for the role of L's official mascot. There's no lollipop in sight but the video does basically confirm that L will be Android 5.0.

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423

Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL review: The best gets (mostly) better

We were all a little concerned to see the Nexus program come to an end, but Google assuaged our fears with the 2016 Pixel phones. They weren't the prettiest devices on the market, but the Pixels showed what was possible when Google got serious about making a phone. These devices had terrific cameras and consistently fast performance—even to this day the Pixel and Pixel XL are robust experiences. They were not perfect, though.

The Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are a chance for Google to address some shortcomings from last year while keeping the things that worked. Google has done that for the most part.

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417

iPhone 6 And 6 Plus: Apple Finally Admits It's Playing Catch-Up, Does Mostly Right By Users

As with every iPhone release over the past four years, your average Android fan is probably summing up today's announcement with a big "so what?" In truth, it's an understandable, if predictable, reaction: Apple has quickly gained a reputation in the smartphone community for turning last year's (or the year before that) features into this year's thing you totally won't believe.

As a lumbering multi-hundred-billion dollar consumer product giant, though, Apple has lost the luxury of disrupting a market it took into the mainstream, and has in recent years moved more and more to the conservative side of the smartphone market, calibrating and refining on a basic hardware premise we've all been familiar with since the iPhone 4: one phone, one size, three storage options, and a dogged refusal to give in to market "trends" it didn't agree with.

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392

After 5 years with Samsung and LG, I moved to a Pixel 2 XL and... nothing has changed

I still remember when we used to bicker over iPhone vs Symbian, before Android took over the second part of that argument. I also remember when Xenon vs LED flash was the most controversial discussion in the smartphone world for several years - some of you may have been toddlers when that started. And I remember when apps weren't a thing, when 3G was the hottest novelty, when we thanked our lucky stars because companies stopped using massive proprietary charging and earphone ports, and when a smartphone with a 2.8" display (Nokia N95 8GB) counted as monstrous. Nowadays, we feel cheated when the second back lens in a phone doesn't bring a lot of improvement, or when the display's color shifts at an angle as if everyone is side-glancing at their phones all the time, when a device has a MicroUSB port and not USB-C, or when it takes a fraction of a millisecond longer for a swipe to register.

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374

Editorial: Android Tablets Still Suck, And Google's Running Out Of Time To Fix Them

I want to ask everyone a question - well, everyone who owns an Android tablet, that is - how often do you instinctively reach for it, as opposed to your phone or laptop? I don't care what the reason is, I'm just genuinely curious how much of a "tweener" role your Android tablet has taken in your life. And after you read this editorial, share that story with me in the comments, because I'd really like to have a discussion with people on this.

I own a Transformer Prime. Know how often I use it? Once, maybe twice a week for a few minutes.

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368

On-Screen Navigation Buttons And Failed Expectations: A Visual Analysis

Honeycomb, the first Android version designed specifically with tablets in mind, was released way back in February 2011. It was built exclusively for large screens and was never meant to reach phones, but it paved the way for Ice Cream Sandwich, arguably one of the most significant updates to ever hit Android. Taking several cues from Honeycomb, Android 4.0 brought about some of the biggest changes to the OS, not the least of which was the advent of virtual or on-screen navigation buttons.

At the time, the use of virtual buttons on phones polarized opinions: some hated the idea while others were quick to sing its praises.

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361

Nexus 9 vs. iPad Air 2: A [Mostly] Subjective Comparison

DISCLAIMER: I bought an iPad Air 2, and I bought said iPad Air 2 after owning the first iPad Air since launch day last year. I sold my iPad Air so I could do this. I really like my iPad Air 2, it's pretty great. I also really like Android. The following article contains my opinions, anecdotal evidence, subjective analysis thereof, and did I mention opinions? There are opinions. Also, this article is very long, so many sections just have side-by-sides of random Android vs iOS app comparisons presented without comment.

I've owned an iPad Air since the original model came out last year (my first iPad), and when the Air 2 came out late last month, I dove right in and bought another.

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