21
Aug
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A little over a year ago, before I was hired at AP, I wrote about the things I wanted my new Honeycomb tablet to be able to do in the next version of Android. Multitasking on tablets was (and still is) non-existent, and I wanted my tablet to be less of a big phone, and more of a small computer. I wanted split screen, and floating apps, and really, I wanted to just make use of this nice, big screen I had.

09
Jul
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Last Updated: October 25th, 2012

I'm not going to lie: after reviewing the Toshiba Excite 7.7 and declaring the 7(ish)-inch form factor my favorite, it was an incredibly difficult task picking up the A700 and giving it a pure, objective review. It feels clunky, cumbersome, and heavy-as-heck in comparison to the Excite 7.7. Alas, I know there is a market for larger, 10.1" tablets so I've done my best to keep an objective mind with this device because, fact is, not everyone is in love with the smaller form factor the way that I currently am.

05
Jul
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Last Updated: July 15th, 2012

Android tablets, for the last year plus they've existed, haven't been anything to get excited over. At least that's my opinion on the matter. And even if you've wanted one (a good one), most of them have been sort of expensive. But now that Google has unveiled the first true Nexus tablet (XOOM who?), for a mere 200 of your dollars, you can get in on the computing revolution.

04
Jul
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Just over a week ago, Aaron and I (Cameron) each received a review unit of the Excite 7.7. While I will largely be taking the reigns on this one, Aaron wanted to throw in his thoughts as well. Thus, while the bulk of the review was written exclusively by me, you'll also see his (clearly labeled) thoughts at the bottom of every section.

Cameron: I have to be honest: after using the Excite 10 and coming away feeling "meh" about it, I didn't have high hopes for its little brother.

01
Jul
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With the flagship Transformer Pad Infinity (TF700) release right around the corner and the release of the budget-oriented Transformer Pad (TF300) a few months ago, Asus has filled out it's line-up of 10" quad-core Android tablets. Obviously, most people would opt for the highest of the high-end (that'd be the TF700) if they were just looking to blow money. Unfortunately, most people aren't just looking for ways to spend as much money as possible, so instead, they spend enough to cover their needs.

25
Jun
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Fun fact: a 1080p display packs 2,073,600 pixels. The Asus Transformer Pad Infinity (or TF700)? 2,304,000 - or 230,400 more. Most 1080p HDTVs are somewhere around 40-60 inches. The TF700 checks in at just 10. Compared to a 40" HDTV, that's 111% of the pixels in a package that's 6.25% of the size.

The screen may be the real headline feature with the Infinity, but it's not the only one worthy of note.

19
Jun
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If you read this site, there's a good chance that you consider yourself a geek on one level or another. If you're also a parent, you undoubtedly want to share your geekdom with your children. Sometimes this means sharing your digital devices with the little one(s), which is something that I don't normally condone (it's just a disaster waiting to happen, in my opinion). But what if you could give your children a tablet of their own?

15
May
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The Tegra 3 tablet battle is in full swing now, with four full-featured tablets on the market at the current moment (ASUS Transformer Prime, Transformer Pad 300, and Acer Iconia Tab A510 being the other three). Today, we're going to take a look at the newest one of the bunch: the Toshiba Excite 10. This is the first device to come out of Toshiba's newly announced Excite line, with 7.7" and 13.3" models coming in early June.

09
May
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Last Updated: May 15th, 2012

Last week, I threw the Acer A510 and the ASUS TF300 in the ring together for a head-to-head battle. After claiming the A510 as the victor, several readers wanted to know how it compares to the Transformer Prime (referred to as the TF201 from here on out). Since you probably already know what a head-to-head is all about, let's just get right to it.

Fight!

First off, let's look at the hardware specs of each:

Acer Iconia Tab A510

ASUS Transformer Prime TF201

10.1-inch 1280x800 TFT display 10.1-inch 1280x800 Super IPS+ display
1.4GHz (single-core)/1.3GHz (multi-core) quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor 1.4GHz (single-core)/1.3GHz (multi-core) quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor
1GB DDR2 RAM 1GB DDR2 RAM
32GB built-in storage 32GB built-in storage
5MP rear camera, 1MP front 8MP f/2.4 rear and 1.2MP front
3.5mm headphone, microSD, microHDMI, and microUSB 3.5mm headphone, microSD, microHDMI, and ASUS proprietary
Android 4.0.3 with Acer Ring Android 4.0.3 with minor ASUS tweaks
6.9" x 10.2" x 0.43", 1.54 lbs.
27
Apr
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Last Updated: May 5th, 2012

Almost one year ago, Acer released its first Android-powered tablet: the Iconia Tab A500. It entered the market at an excellent price point, while still offering the same hardware specs as the then-current tablet top-dogs. As a result, the Android community embraced this budget powerhouse, making it one of the more popular Android tablets of 2011.

Fast-forward to the present, and the A500's successor, the A510, is now available. This is more of an incremental update to the A500, as it packs the NVIDIA's powerhouse quad-core Tegra 3 superchip, but the majority of the other specs are nearly identical to its predecessor.

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