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Marshall Major II Review: Finally, A Good, Portable On-Ear Headphone That Isn't A Fashion Disaster

A "cool" personal audio brand is a surprisingly rare thing, and if you've paid much attention to the market for premium brand headphones lately, Marshall's been a real up-and-comer. The Marshall brand is actually licensed by a Swedish company called Zound Industries, with Marshall granting the right to use the iconic trademark and style of its amplifiers and other products on personal audio gear. It doesn't hurt that the products are good - Zound has made some surprisingly great Bluetooth speakers and headphones, and the original Major on-ear was probably the brand's biggest success yet.

The Major II is a small(-ish) update to that headphone, with a few new tricks in terms of construction and style, though mostly a promise of superior power and low-end response that the original were, albeit only slightly, criticized for lacking.

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Parrot Bebop (Quadricopter Drone) Review: Easily Parrot's Best Drone Yet

I've used the two large quadricopters Parrot has released to date - the AR.Drone and AR.Drone 2.0 - but ever since I saw the Bebop at CES earlier this year, I knew I had to give it a try. The Bebop attacks two of the biggest issues of its predecessors head on; namely, size and video quality.

Parrot has stepped up to a full 1080p-ready video sensor (it also takes 14MP stills) with an f2.2 wide-angle fisheye lens on the Bebop, and also reduced the size of the drone itself dramatically. The Bebop in outdoor trim (no hull guards) has about one fourth of the footprint of the old AR.Drones in their full bumpers.

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HTC One M9 Review: The Phone Only HTC Could Build... For The Third Time

HTC was one of Android's earliest supporters. When the Dream launched in 2009, little did HTC likely know that its fortunes would skyrocket in the few years after, along with its share of the smartphone market. Not long after, though, those fortunes began to wane - with the launch of the original One series (One X, S, V), HTC's first attempt to rebrand its smartphone design image began.

The One X was, and I still think is, a beautiful phone. While the Tegra version was lamentable, the Qualcomm-powered variants received generally wide praise. The next year, One M7 launched. It, too, was very good-looking, and while the Ultrapixel camera was controversial, the phone debuted to very positive reviews.

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Thrustmaster Score-A Controller Review: A Serviceable Gamepad That's A Few Notes Shy Of A Recommendation

I have been hunting for an ideal Android game controller for a long time. I've tried tons of them: tiny, retro, travel-oriented, and full-size. None have hit that perfect combination of portability and utility (for as much as "utility" can be applied to a gaming accessory) that makes it a recommendation for everyone. Thrustmaster, a minor player in the gaming accessory market, has had its Score-A Bluetooth controller that's specifically designed for Android available at retail for a while now. Can this compact controller, complete with Android navigation buttons and a full console button complement, rise above the rest?

No, not really.

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Hands On With The Blu Studio X Plus And Studio G, Available Now Exclusively From Best Buy

 

Back at CES in January, Blu announced a handful of upcoming devices that were all basically slated to hit shelves in the first quarter of 2015. We've already taken a look at two of those phones: the super sleek and thin Vivo Air, as well as the massive battery-packing Studio Energy. Today, I have the Studio X Plus (which is exactly like the Studio X, just larger) and the ultra-affordable Studio G, two more devices that were announced in that same lineup.

Both phones are from Blu's Studio line, which is basically Blu's midrange series of devices. You typically find slightly slower processors and lower-quality displays than what you'd see on the company's higher-end devices, but they also have prices to match.

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Griffin iTrip AUX Review: A Cheap Way To Get Bluetooth In Your Car That's Still Kind Of Pricey

Newer cars let you connect your phone over Bluetooth, empowering you to stream music and make calls. The capability is found in most base models nowadays, but drivers of older cars typically have to install an aftermarket radio to get in on the fun. The Griffin iTrip AUX Bluetooth is a cheaper way to get some of the benefits of Bluetooth without having to fork over as much money.

Griffin2 Griffin3

But at $49.99, the iTrip AUX Bluetooth remains a bit pricey itself. It works as advertised, but in this case, I don't know if that is enough. Here, let me tell you why.

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Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 Pro (13") Review: Interesting Hardware And Poor Software Combine To Make a Below-Average Tablet

Lenovo has crammed just about everything it can think of into the Yoga Tablet 2 Pro to make it interesting, with the exception of a stylus and a can opener. And it is interesting, from a purely technical point of view - it has a huge 13" screen, 2.1 JLB speakers, integrated kickstand, and oh yeah, a built-in pico projector. This machine epitomizes one of the best things about Android hardware: a diversity of manufacturers can yield an amazing variety of features.

Unfortunately, Lenovo's design is more ambitious than its execution. With a build quality that's only average, some questionable hardware decisions, and a software experience that's poor at best, the Yoga Tablet 2 Pro simply won't be worth a look for most people.

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Hands-On With dbrand Nexus 6 Skins: Like A Tailor-Made Suit For Your Phone

A couple of weeks ago when dbrand offered up all its skins for 25% off, I mentioned how boring most Android phones look these days (save for a few, like the Moto X since it's customizable). As a result, we decided that going hands-on with some dbrand stuff might be pretty fun, and what better phone than the oversized-and-aesthetically-boring Nexus 6 to be the guinea pig? I threw a variety of different combos on this beasty, which includes some super sleek options and also a couple of the worst combos I could possible think of (because why not?).

Regardless of color, one thing always stayed consistent: these skins are quality.

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Hands-On With The Tylt VU Solo: It's A VU, Only Smaller

One of my favorite innovations that has started to become more mainstream over the past several years is wireless charging. I'm bummed that every phone doesn't have it at this point (looking at you, Motorola - the Moto X should've been qi-compatible!), because it's easily one of the most convenient changes of all time. OK, maybe that's a little hyperbolic...but really, I do love it.

When it comes to wireless charging, my go-to charger has been the Tylt VU for as long as I can remember. The angle is great, it's super easy to use, and it's large enough to charge basically everything I own that has wireless charging.

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LG G Flex2 Review: More Practical, Less Interesting

Specs

Operating System Android 5.0.1
Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 octacore - 4x A57 processors at 2GHz, 4x A53 processors at 1.6GHz
GPU Adreno 430
Display 5.5" P-OLED flexible display with Gorilla Glass 3 and LG Dura Guard Glass at 1920x1080 (403 DPI)
RAM 2GB
Storage 16-32GB, microSD slot.
Battery 3000mAh, non-removable.
Camera 13MP (OIS, laser auto-focus) rear, 2.1MP front
Connectivity Bluetooth 4.1, Wi-Fi AC, IR, NFC, 3G, LTE (bands depend on market)
Weight 152g

The Good

Size The G Flex 2 lacks the portly dimensions of its predecessor, and is just slightly larger than an ordinary G3, with the same 5.5" display size.
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