15
Oct
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Don't panic! Despite the original Lollipop announcement stating the update would "be available on Nexus 5, 7, 10 and Google Play edition devices in the coming weeks," it looks like Nexus 4 owners won't be left out in the cold after all.

Googler Sascha Prüter clarifies in a Google+ post that the Nexus 4's conspicuous absense is "just a mistake." Indeed, the error is already fixed. There's no specific word on timing, but if history is anything to go by, the N4 will fall right in line with the rest of the Nexus updates soon enough.

20
Sep
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Nexus 4 owners, don't lose hope. Though your 2012 Google phone was cruelly looked over for the developer preview builds of Android L (along with everything that wasn't a Nexus 7 2013 or Nexus 5), sharp-eyed Google+ users have spotted two different Google employees posting on the Chromium section of code.google.com claiming to use the Nexus 4 with Android L. Check out this entry from a contributor with a Chromium.org email address, explicitly using the "LRW52G" build of Android on his or her N4.

07
Jul
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Google has only posted official images of the Android L developer preview for the WiFi Nexus 7 and the Nexus 5, but Nexus 4 users want a piece of the action too. That's why folks on XDA have been burning the midnight oil to get Android L running on last year's Nexus. Beta 2 of the N4 port is now up, and it seems to have resolved the showstopper bugs from the first one.

01
Jul
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It looks like Google is serious about getting the "L" preview out to developers in all of its forms, even as code. That's right, some of the source code is already live on AOSP!Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 4.15.59 PM

It looks like all of the recent Nexus devices are covered - everything from the 2012 Nexus 7 up through to the Nexus 5. Of course, just because branches have been published for these devices, it is not absolute confirmation that this entire list of devices will receive an official L release.

04
Jun
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Nexus 4 and Nexus 10 owners, your Android 4.4.3 OTAs have finally begun, and the zip urls have been captured. A bit later than some others, but all things considered, waiting for an Android update for an extra day or two hasn't killed anyone.

If you're not familiar with the manual installation process, it's easy - just follow the steps in our guide for an earlier update, and you'll be set up with Android 4.4.3 in no time.

08
Jan
Scratcheddisk

If you're an audio perfectionist, you've surely stumbled onto flac, an audio compression format designed to deliver lossless recordings. The file sizes are considerably larger than your average MP3, but the sound quality is unparalleled by lossy compression algorithms. It's not hard to see why audiophiles drift towards flac as their preferred storage medium. Now imagine the latest version of Android is causing stuttering, cracks, pops, and static in the otherwise perfect playback of flac.

30
Dec
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If you like to mod your Nexus devices but you're also a fan of tight security, you probably already know BootUnlocker. It's a simple app that allows rooted devices to lock and unlock the bootloader without wiping user data. The developer, segv11, is back with v1.5.1 of this handy little utility. The latest update adds support for the WiFi (flo) and LTE (deb) variants of the 2013 Nexus 7 and the ability to set the tamper flag on the Nexus 4 (mako) and Nexus 5 (hammerhead).

28
Dec
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The Bluetooth experience on Android has always been a rocky road. For the first few years Android relied on BlueZ, a "protocol stack" originally developed by Qualcomm for the Linux operating system. Despite many limitations and missing features, BlueZ served admirably until Android 4.2 launched with a new stack dubbed Bluedroid, a project built jointly by Google and Broadcom. Like any young project, the bugs were plentiful, but most of the critical issues were solved in the first few weeks.

25
Dec
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Typically Christmas day is a slow one for technology news, but apparently the good folks at the Android Open Kang Project have dragged their coding machines in front of the open fire. Today AOKP has posted the first nightly builds of Android 4.4.2, granting deliciously fresh custom ROMs to all the good little girls and boys. And all the bad ones too, I suppose.

Screenshot_2013-12-26-01-43-44 Screenshot_2013-12-26-01-42-09 Screenshot_2013-12-26-01-49-35

The list of initially-supported devices doesn't cover AOKP's official support list yet, but it covers most of the major Nexus devices, Samsung's Galaxy SIII and S4 American and international incarnations, all five major versions of the HTC One, and a handful of Sony devices (because they tend to be pretty open as far as bootloaders and modifications go).

09
Dec
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Google only started the Android 4.4.1 update last week, but it looks like a new hotfix is already good to go, as 4.4.2 showed up for Nexus devices in the last hour. So far, we've seen it on the Nexus 4, Nexus 5, and the Nexus 7, but it's probably safe to say the Nexus 10 is not going to be far behind. Update: Nexus 10 confirmed too.

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