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Android has overtaken Windows for the first time as the most popular OS in total internet usage across desktop, laptop, tablet, and mobile combined

The research arm of StatCounter, an independent web analytics company, has revealed an interesting stat today: according to its numbers, Android has overtaken Windows for the first time in terms of worldwide total internet usage.

This bold statement comes with a lot of asterisks. We're talking about total internet usage here, not sales numbers or users. We're also looking at worldwide usage across all platforms combined (desktop, laptop, tablet, mobile). And even then, the difference is minimal at 37.93% for Android compared to 37.91% for Windows.

The distinction of platforms is important because if we were only looking at desktops, Windows would have an 84% usage share.

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Android 7.1.2 appears to be rolling out now to Nexus Player and Pixel C

Android O is expected later this year, but there's still (at least) one more update to Android 7.1. Google released the first 7.1.2 Beta back in January, followed by a second beta in March. We've now received multiple reports of 7.1.2 being pushed to users outside the beta program.

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Google is moving to a new issue tracker

When it comes to Android issue tracking, Google has always used Google Code. However, Google started phasing out Code for most users in 2013, and Google's projects are the only active repositories left. Now the company has started to shift to a new issue tracker, hosted at issuetracker.google.com.

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InBrief
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Google Map Maker is officially dead

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YouTube improves on its iOS-esque UI test with a bottom nav bar and some layout changes

YouTube is constantly testing new interfaces or features, often at the same time. Case in point: we published an article about a new YouTube comments layout on Android just two days ago, and here you are, reading another one today. As you may have guessed from the title, the bottom nav bar is back, but with some nice tweaks from the last time we saw it. It's virtually identical to iOS's YouTube app now.

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[Continuously updated] April Fools' Roundup: All the jokes from around the web

April Fools Day is almost upon us, but some companies aren't waiting to share their pranks. Google always does a great job, from the Pokemon Google Maps overlay to a smart mailbox, but there are a few from other companies worth mentioning. Here's a rundown of all the hilarious (or strange) tech-related April Fools Day jokes from around the web.

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The Pixel C is now officially supported by TWRP

The Pixel C is Google's newest attempt at making a tablet. Like all Nexus and Pixel devices, it has a large number of custom ROMs available for it, but there wasn't actually an official version of TWRP recovery until now.

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Nexus 5X long-term review: The end of an era

The Nexus 5X was one of the last devices with the Nexus brand (unless Google revives it), along with the Huawei-made 6P. Compared to its predecessor, the Nexus 5, it had a faster processor, a far superior camera, a fingerprint sensor, and more. When the 5X was released in 2015, it was easily one of the best value devices you could buy - but how does it hold up a year and a half later?

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Android Wear 2.0 update is arriving on six more watches, but still no mainstream ones

Yesterday, Google finally gave a reason on why most Android Wear watches still haven't received the long-awaited 2.0 update: "a bug found in final testing." Some commenters speculated that this might have something to do with Snapdragon chipsets, given how the first few watches that received the update used chipsets from other manufacturers. That being said, five of the six watches on today's list sport the Snapdragon 2100.

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[Firebase Firebase Firebase] The first wave of I/O sessions is live on the official site

Google I/O, otherwise known as Android Christmas, is about a month and a half away, but it's never too early to start getting excited about it. Even if you didn't get the opportunity to purchase a ticket or you did but can't go, the sessions are streamed live and then published on YouTube so everyone can watch them and catch up on all the new things in Android.

The Google I/O website was updated yesterday to add the first wave of Google I/O sessions, so you can start planning your schedule whether you're attending live or watching at home. The main keynote is the first day, May 17, at 10am PT, and it's followed by many sessions including "What's new in Android." The second day's sessions focus on more specifics like the new things in Google Play, Android Security, and Android Design Tools.

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