Android Police

News

...

Google Teases Hands Free, The Public Name For "Plaso," Yet Another Android-Based Mobile Payment System

Are you unexcited about Android Pay? Not liking your Wallet Card? Maybe you just want another Google payment platform... because? Then I've got great news: Google Hands Free will be a thing at some point later this year.

How's it work? I've got no idea, because Google doesn't actually tell us. Well, actually, we sort of do know, because Hands Free leaked as Plaso over three months ago.

The idea here is similar to that of the now-defunct Square Wallet, which used a combination of proximity detection and a picture of your face to allow you to buy stuff without ever having to pull out a credit card, phone, or even your ID.

Read More
...

Google's ATAP Introduces Project Jacquard To Make Interactive Textiles Easier To Produce And Use

Combining metallic alloys with natural or synthetic threads, Google's ATAP and its industrial partners have created Jacquard yarn. Named for Joseph Marie Jacquard's inventions, the yarn is the basis for ATAP's Project Jacquard, an effort to make it easy for textile makers to weave interactive surfaces into everyday textiles like clothes and furniture. These surfaces would ultimately control things like mobile devices, and perhaps evolve into experiences and functions of their own. Jacquard yarn allows these new surfaces to either be plainly visible or completely hidden from the user so, just like regular yarn, designers can decide exactly how a surface will appear - or not appear, as the case may be.

Read More
...

Smart Lock Passwords Is Now Going Live On Pre-Android M Devices, Web Interface Is Active Too

One of the relatively hidden treasures of yesterday's I/O announcements and Android M preview release was Smart Lock Passwords, which takes credentials you've signed in with on Chrome or for Android apps and automatically signs you in on those platforms in the future. At launch, there are not many app partners, but developers need only use a now-public API to add support. Today, Lollipop users with relatively recent Google Play Services are finding the new feature enabled on their devices as well.

Read More
...

[Android M Feature Spotlight] The New Do Not Disturb Includes Custom Rules And A Repeat Caller Exception

We already went over the gist of Android M's Do Not Disturb mode, but this isn't just a re-branding of priority interruptions. There are some cool new features in the settings that make DND on Android M quite appealing. It's easier to make DND work for your schedule without a ton of fiddling around.

Screenshot_20150528-145310 Screenshot_20150528-145315 Screenshot_20150528-145547

Read More
InBrief
...

HTC Posts Kernel Sources For Android 5.1 On One M7, M8 Google Play Editions

...

[Android M Feature Spotlight] Priority Interruption Mode Is Now Do Not Disturb (Again)

You might remember that the L preview last year introduced a Do Not Disturb mode to Android, but you don't have that exact feature in Lollipop. By the time it was done, this feature became the somewhat more convoluted Priority/None settings. In the M preview it's called Do Not Disturb again, and the basic functionality is a little simpler.

2015-05-29 10.20.24 2015-05-29 10.20.50 2015-05-29 10.21.29

Read More
...

Portal And Half-Life 2 Updated With Support For SHIELD Android TV

Portal and Half-Life 2 were both launch titles for the SHIELD Portable, and to this day remain two of the best games you can play on Android. Recently, both apps got updated to support Android TV, which really only means one thing: they support the new SHIELD set-top box. That's good, because playing them on the TV is honestly one of the best ways to experience these classic FPS titles. Here's a look at the changelogs for each:

Portal

portal2

What's New
- Android TV support
- UI improvements
- Broader localizations
- Cloud saves, achievements

Half-Life 2

hl2

What's New
- SHIELD Android TV support
- UI improvements
- Broader localizations

While Portal got cloud saves and achievements via Google Games, it looks like HL2 may have not been so lucky.

Read More
...

[Update: Android Too, And Content Descriptors] Google Play Store Listings Start Showing The New Content Ratings And Interactive Elements On The Web

Back in March, Google announced a few changes to its Play Store listings — a content rating system and a manual approval process for apps. The latter had been in effect for a while, but the former is now showing up on the web version of the Play Store. (I can't see it on my Android phone yet at the time the article is being written.) Edit: It should also show up on Android, on the Play Store version 5.6.6.

Instead of the everyone / low maturity / medium maturity / high maturity system that was in place before, the Play Store will now use standard ratings like any content provider.

Read More
...

[Android M Feature Spotlight] Multi-window (Well, Kind Of)

Late last year, we took an early look at a then-rumored feature that we expected to see in an upcoming build of Android: Multi-window. We've heard rumors and whatnot since then, but no physical implementation had been spotted. Now, Multi-window is a real thing, it's part of M, and you can try it today (if you're willing to mod your device a little bit).

mw wm2

Thanks to Andrew and Josh for the screenshots

It's worth mentioning that this is still very early in its development and is quite buggy. But the idea is there - you can run two things on the screen at one time.

Read More
...

[Android M Feature Spotlight] You Can Now Disable Peeking, AKA Heads-Up Notifications, On A Per App Basis

Lollipop 5.0 introduced sliding heads-up notifications instead of the scrolling status bar ticker that had been used on all Android versions prior. They showed up on top of your current screen for a few seconds, then went back into the notification tray. However, the function still seemed quite unfinished, with notifications blocking everything underneath them unless you completely got rid of them or waited for them to disappear. Lollipop 5.1 made it possible to dismiss notifications with a swipe up, sending them back to the tray so you can check them later.

android-m-app-notification-peeking

Android M makes this functionality optional, and that's one very welcome change. Each app's settings page has an "App notifications" screen where you can block all notifications from the selected app, treat them as priority, and "Allow peeking." The latter enables the heads-up sliding notifications on top of other apps.

Read More
Page 724 of 2,676«First...10...722723724725726...730...Last»