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LG, the V20 is your best chance for smartphone success in years - don’t screw it up

LG and the V20 could hardly have hoped for a more fortuitous turn of events in recent weeks. Samsung’s Note7 has been globally recalled for a serious battery defect, and replacement shipments are nowhere to be seen. The V20, by contrast, offers an increasingly rare removable battery. Meanwhile, Apple’s iPhone 7 duo have been unveiled without a headphone jack. The V20 proudly touts its high-end wired audio capabilities as being among the best in the smartphone world. It may be of little consequence that it will likely be the first, or at least technically first, phone to ship with Android 7.0 - but of much greater import is the fact that it will be available on all four major US carriers.

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Like them or not, Google's Pixel phones will be the iPhone competitor we've demanded for years

Last year, I attended the launch of the Nexus 5X and 6P. Google also introduced the Pixel C, a refreshed Chromecast, and the new Chromecast Audio at this event to an audience of maybe 100 to 150 journalists. For the biggest company in tech, it felt like a small affair, and if I'm honest, one without much sense of occasion. We were seated in an artsy venue in San Francisco in a room that had been converted into a sort of banquet hall. Front and center, there was a small stage. I watched Sundar Pichai walk up that stage to greet us good morning, much in the way the Senior Vice President Of Team Building would kick off ManageCamp '16 at the Hilton.

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Will the iPhone 7's capacitive home button finally mean the death of the Galaxy's physical one?

An iPhone 7 take that isn't about the headphone jack? Surprising! But yesterday's Apple announcement contained one piece of information that left me really wondering about the future of the world's most popular brand of Android smartphones. The iPhone 7 has officially ditched the physical home button - and I'd argue that decision makes complete sense. Failed home buttons have been a hallmark of iPhone ownership even from the early days, and relying on an oddly primitive, analog mechanical key as the access point to a device that will likely be used hundreds of times a day by the average owner doesn't really make sense in 2016.

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Meet the new guy: Jordan Palmer

When I was approached about writing an introductory post about myself, I really had no idea where to start. The point here is to get to know me a bit better, so I guess I will start with the basics.

I am currently a senior at the University of Colorado on track to earn my Bachelor's in Business Administration. Despite my major, I am obviously a huge geek. It began with the movie Tron, a film that ignited my imagination for the world of computers. Though, my primary focus at the time was on riding a lightcycle. The concept of the Grid led me to explore programming.

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CrossOver Preview runs Windows apps on Android and Chromebooks, even Photoshop

Last week, CodeWeavers announced that after three years of development, a preview version of CrossOver for Android would be released. Why was I so excited? Because CrossOver allows you to run Windows programs on Mac and Linux, and they brought their expertise over to Android. After trying out the Preview version for a week (which you can sign up for here), I'm extremely impressed by its capabilities, despite some major limitations.

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Meet the new guy: Richard Gao

I won that Bingle Bear Android figure from AP almost a year before I started working here.

Hey, I'm Richard. I'm a senior at a high school in New Jersey. You may have noticed that I've started writing a few Android Police articles during the past three weeks or so. I'm nowhere near as talented as fellow newbie Corbin is with software development, but I do share his love for Android and his habit of overspending on tech.

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Meet the new guy: Corbin Davenport

The boxes of all my Android devices (minus the watches).

When I started writing for Android Police earlier this month, some of you recognized me from when I installed Windows 95 (among other things) on my watch. But outside of me shoving emulators on my watches, I've worked on some cool projects and spent way too much on electronics.

I started trying to learn development when I was around 12, armed with a copy of Adobe Dreamweaver CS3 and my iMac G5. A year later, I started developing extensions for Google Chrome, which I still work on to this day. I still regularly update my first extension, Wikipedia Search.

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HTC's broken 15-day update promise for the One A9 is a small symptom of a larger malady

Last year, HTC promised that the One A9 would receive Android OS updates within 15 [business] days of the first Nexus device to get that update. HTC almost immediately failed to meet its self set goal with security patches, and last I checked, my One A9 was rocking a June 1st security update in early August (it does now have the August security patch, though). Now HTC is seemingly implying the One A9 may not get Nougat until 2017, or: at least not until well after the end of August it would have under its 15-day no-longer-a-rule.

Given very few people bought the One A9, this should not surprise you in the least.

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RIP: The Nexus 5 isn't getting Android 7.0 Nougat, let's say our goodbyes

While the Nexus 5 will likely live to see the chewy center of Nougat via community-built custom ROMs, it's now official that the phone so many of us loved will never get a Google-sanctioned Android 7.0 release. Let us mourn.

The Nexus 5 launched in late 2013 - you can go back and read our review, in which Liam, Ryan, and I took to a single post to combine our thoughts on the device. They were largely positive, too: the Nexus 5 was easily the most well-received Nexus phone yet when it was released, with both consumers and reviewers alike praising its unique design, excellent performance, and compelling price.

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Simply No Choice: T-Mobile's new "ONE" plan is not good for consumers, sets bad precedents

Starting on September 6th, new T-Mobile postpaid subscribers or current postpaid customers looking to change their plan will have exactly one choice: the ONE plan. T-Mobile is dramatically simplifying its [admittedly, confusing at times] plan structure for individuals and families by introducing literally one plan. Again: the ONE plan. It works like this - as you can see in detail in our post on the news - but let me give you the flyby version.

As an individual, you'd pay $70 per month for the ONE plan. Unlimited talk, text, and data. Sounds nice! And simple. But the strings attached aren't so much strings as structural-grade steel cables.

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