03
Dec
n10_1

If you're itching to ROM up your Nexus 10, now's probably the time to start - CyanogenMod 10 nightlies have officially landed for Google's large Nexus slate, available now at the CM website.

cm10n10

Not much else to say about that - other than hoping it'll solve some of the various issues we've been seeing with Android 4.2, like the Nexus 10's delightful little random reboots. Head to the source link to grab it.

30
Nov
wm1_DSC_0367

Still stuck with an Epic 4G Touch (or stuck a relative with your old one)? If you've been holding off on flashing some of the previously leaked Jelly Bean builds for fear of stability or finality, Sextape has released what is rumored to be the final build that will go out as an over the air update some time in the near future.

FXgZB ZY8JD

Build FK23 can be downloaded here, and is relatively easy to flash.

29
Nov
wm_IMG_4710

HTC has released the kernel source code (v1.15.605.4) for the DROID DNA, which you can download at the HTCdev site here (direct link to file here).

dna

The DNA, which has an unlockable bootloader through an exploit we published last week, is HTC's latest and greatest on Verizon, and the first 1080p phone to be sold in the US. This kernel source should allow developers to start tweaking the DNA a little more thoroughly, and improve custom ROM support.

29
Nov
nex7back

If you head on over to Google's factory image site, you'll find brand-new images based on the incremental update to Android 4.2.1. The devices with factory images currently available include the Nexus 7, Nexus 7 3G, Galaxy Nexus (takju, yakju), and Nexus 4. The 4.2.1 image for the Nexus 10 has been delayed, according to JBQ, due to an issue with JOP40C not being flashable over older builds. This has since been fixed, and you can download the new 4.2 factory image for the Nexus 10, though it's still build JOP40C.

28
Nov
Galaxy Note ii

Samsung's released the open source code for the Galaxy Premier (GT-9260), as well as the Verizon version of the Galaxy Note II (SCH-I605), which just had its official sale details announced a few minutes ago.

s21

s1

Hit up the source links to get your code on.

Samsung Open Source: VZW Note II, Galaxy Premier

27
Nov
lights2
Last Updated: February 12th, 2013

Earlier today, both the Nexus 4 and the Nexus 10 started receiving small ~1MB OTAs to Android 4.2.1 with fixes to the missing month of December in the People app, among other things. The corresponding open source files are being pushed by Google to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) as we speak, Android release engineer Jean-Baptiste Queru just announced in the Android Building group.

The build number is JOP40D and the tag is android-4.2.1_r1.

24
Nov
1

When the Droid DNA was first announced, we were all surprised to find that the bootloader was unlockable at HTCdev.com. Because of this, the device actually got root, recovery, and custom kernel days before the official release. Unfortunately, by the time the device became available in retail channels, Verizon pulled the plug  and it was no longer unlocked through official means.

Thankfully, there's another way (isn't there always?). The softmod below will effectively change the carrier information, allowing it to once again be unlocked via HTC's official tool.

20
Nov
wm_IMG_3893

It's pretty disheartening to get an awesome new phone only to realize the bootloader's locked down tight. That's means no custom recovery, no ROMs, no custom kernels, no... anything fun. Until, of course, some dedicated developers get ahold of the device in question and bend it to their will. That's exactly what Project FreeGee has done for both the Sprint and AT&T variants of the LG Optimus G.

The tool essentially unlocks the bootloader of both devices, allowing a custom recovery - and eventually, custom ROMs - to be flashed.

19
Nov
jb-new-logo
Last Updated: January 8th, 2013

We all love Android, and we also love when Google releases a new iteration of our favorite mobile OS. Sometimes, though, even Google screws up a bit, and Android 4.2 is looking to be one of the most bug-ridden releases since Honeycomb. And, let's be honest: 4.2 isn't exactly the leap that 2.3 to 3.0 was, either. Chances are, if you're on Android 4.2, you've experienced at least one of the issues here.

16
Nov
Untitled-2

Google recently updated its SDK license terms for the first time in a long while. While most changes are minor, one change has been grabbing quite a few headlines – Google's proclamation that those using the SDK are disallowed from taking "any actions that may cause or result in the fragmentation of Android". Here's the full clause in question:

3.4 You agree that you will not take any actions that may cause or result in the fragmentation of Android, including but not limited to distributing, participating in the creation of, or promoting in any way a software development kit derived from the SDK.

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