26
Jun
Screenshot_2014-06-26-18-41-55

A long-requested feature in Android has been a native "do not disturb" mode, similar to what Apple has featured in iOS for some time now. With Android L, that feature arrived. Do not disturb allows you to block "all interruptions" with exceptions for things like phones calls and SMS messages, which can be limited further still to contacts or starred contacts. You can set scheduling for the feature, too.

Screenshot_2014-06-26-18-40-48 Screenshot_2014-06-26-18-41-19 Screenshot_2014-06-26-18-41-55

DND mode shows up in both the settings pulldown and the notification bar (though it looks a bit like a "no signal / SIM" icon if you ask me).

26
Jun
Screenshot_2014-06-26-18-37-35

For the next installment of our ongoing series Things You May Not Have Noticed About Android L So Let Us Tell You About Them, we're heading over to revamped settings app. Now, sure, it looks pretty and nice and oh so clean, but the settings menu has a new surprise in store: search.

Screenshot_2014-06-26-18-37-35

Like many Samsung phones, stock Android now has a built-in search function in the settings area, allowing you to quickly and scroll-lessly find just what you're looking for.

26
Jun
RcAxqAXcL

Update: As many of you have pointed out, this feature isn't new for everyone. What is new is the checkbox you're seeing below, which was not previously a part of the sign-in process. The checkbox, now decoupled from the global "restore all the things" setting, lets you get back just the Wi-Fi passwords but not apps and settings, or the other way around (which isn't nearly as useful).

While it's not exactly aggravating, per se, having to enter your Wi-Fi password every time you get a new phone or tablet (or reset your current one) is something that doesn't exactly feel like living in the future.

26
Jun
Screenshot_2014-06-26-17-24-54

Here's a cool little Android "L" feature you may not have noticed - just bring up your lockscreen and swipe right. Boom. Dialer. This new shortcut, unlike the old camera gesture, does require that you enter your pin or unlock code before the dialer will actually open, but it's handy nonetheless.

Screenshot_2014-06-26-16-56-22 Screenshot_2014-06-26-16-58-00 Screenshot_2014-06-26-16-56-43

You can, of course, alternatively swipe up on the dialer icon at the bottom of the lockscreen, too, though this is arguably quicker and definitely a bit more eyes-free in terms of getting the gesture right.

26
Jun
nexusae0_apis_thumb3

Developers and Android information fanatics, this is just a quick PSA that the official API overview, developer materials, and L Developer Preview reference are all now available on the Android developers site. The API overview can be found here, and the developer reference is right here.

If you want a detailed, piece-by-piece breakdown of the developer-facing changes in Android, the developer reference is by far your best bet. It includes tons of information, what's been added, what's been changed, and what's been removed in the "L" release.

26
Jun
beeeeeam

Android Beam has been around since 4.0, but the NFC sharing tool has always been a little awkward (I think I've used it successfully twice in three years), since it relies on both phones physically detecting each other in proximity before you can even initiate the sending process. In the preview versions of the "L" release, Beam finally gets its own dedicated option in the standard Android Share menu, which should make it much less ambiguous.

26
Jun
Screenshot_2014-06-26-17-24-54

In the "news that will ease your OCD" category, Android "L" finally adds proper support for the battery percentage trick we were first made aware of in Android 4.4. Yes, you still have to download an app from XDA (or use a couple lines of ADB commands) from this post to get it working in the first place, but in the "L" release it no longer periodically disappears or decides not to work in certain situations.

26
Jun
1

So, the Android L developer preview is here for the Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (2013, Wi-Fi) and a few of us here at AP have been playing with it today. The changes are vast and quite drastic (but all pretty damn good thus far), and we want to highlight a few of the more notable things.

The lockscreen is one of the areas that's getting a pretty heavy makeover in the L release (henceforth just known as L), and, since it's generally the first thing you see when a device is turned on, seemed like a logical starting point.

26
Jun
dng

There have been rumblings of RAW-style image capture support in Android for some time now, and it looks like the "L" release will finally bring photographers everywhere the freedom to individually process and archive their smartphone photos DSLR-style. The "L" developer documentation specifically mentions the new DngCreator class, an API that will allow camera apps to capture images and save them in the Digital Negative format, an open standard published by Adobe as a more generally-compatible alternative to RAW images (which generally require OEM or camera-specific plugins).

26
Jun
unnamed

Ever wondered why you have to open up a PDF in Android on Chrome or using a 3rd-party viewer? Well, it's because up until now Android hasn't had a native PDF rendering tool in place. As of Android "L," it does. If you're on Android 4.4 or below, try opening a PDF in the Drive app - you'll be sent to whatever your native PDF viewing tool happens to be. Now, if you're on the "L" preview release, do the same thing in Drive (make sure no PDF viewers are installed, that might break this behavior), and you'll see the PDF displays natively in the app.

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