17
Oct
Screenshot_2014-10-17-15-19-35

A robust system for sharing has been one of Android's greatest features since the launch of the OS. Despite its usefulness and how often we see it, the sharing menu has seen little more than cosmetic changes over the years. That is, until now. As of Android 5.0, the standard Sharing menu will now be ordered by priority, showing you the most used destinations at the top of your list.

Screenshot_2014-10-17-15-19-35Screenshot_2014-10-17-14-46-06Screenshot_2014-10-17-16-09-04

KitKat contained a simple version of this feature, but it only pushed the most recently used app to the top of the list and left the rest of the items in alphabetical order.

17
Oct
key

For a while now, we've been aware of an unreleased keyboard theme, shown off in screenshots of Google Chrome on the Play Store. Today, the Android 5.0 Lollipop developer preview brought us Google Keyboard 4.0 that carries both the Material Light and Dark themes. There's really not much to say about the themes that can't be communicated in images - they are similar to the keyboard included in the original dev preview, but now there's a light theme.

17
Oct
list

You're probably familiar with the redesigned recent apps list in Android 5.0—it's a very pretty stack of cards with fluid animations. Now you won't have to worry about losing your place after a reboot. As of Lollipop, the app list will not be cleared when you turn the device off.

2014-10-17 21.05.55-1

17
Oct
ic_launcher_google_search

We've been waiting on a big update to Google's search app, having seen screenshots here and there that hinted at an updated design. With today's new Lollipop developer preview, the Google app's 4.0 incarnation was made available. We've got a download at the bottom of the post, but be sure to read the instructions first as getting this up and running on pre-L devices requires some extra fiddling. Also, you'll need to be rooted.

17
Oct
2014-10-17 15_45_47-111.gif (372×372)

Previously, long-pressing a notification would offer a link to the app info page of any app that produced it. With Android 5.0 Lollipop Google is improving this functionality. Simply long-press and you get the app name and icon, as well as a link to the app notification settings. Look at how wonderfully hypnotic the animation is.

111

17
Oct
searchscreenthumb

Lollipop brings in significant changes to the way Android switches back and forth between recent apps. In KitKat, this feature worked the same way it did in Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich, and Jelly Bean. In short, you clicked the third icon in the navigation bar at the bottom, and the recent apps appeared as a list of thumbnails and app icons arranged into a column.

With Android 5.0, the entire look and feel changes.

17
Oct
1[6]

On a scale of one to ten, I avoided Flappy Bird like the plague. I didn't play it. I didn't write about it. I didn't look at it in the Play Store. I wanted nothing to do with it and its evil ways. If you just can't get enough of that silly crap, however, there's an Easter Egg in Lollipop that you're just going to love: a Flappy Bird clone with huge lollipops and the bugdroid.

17
Oct
2014-10-17 13_35_27-[Lollipop Feature Spotlight] You Can Now Touch Notifications When Quick Settings

Android 5.0 brings with it a big redesign of the notification and Quick Settings area, but there was a seemingly odd quirk in the first developer preview. You could see the notifications when Quick Settings was open, but you couldn't interact. Now you can.

2014-10-17 18.33.23

17
Oct
graythumb

Lollipop goes after the operating system's janky app restoration process in a big way. Android 5.0 lets users transfer data from one device to another just by tapping the two together using Near Field Communication. But if you don't have a gadget with NFC or can't be bothered with that approach, the setup process also lets you pull down apps from devices that have been backed up to your account. You can even select specific apps to download, so you don't need to bring down all of the junk from your other device.

17
Oct
1[7]

Use two-factor authentication? If not, you should, because it's more secure than if you don't use it. If you already use it, then you probably remember a time when the Android setup process was obnoxious because you not only had to put in your password twice, but also had to deal with an annoying web prompt to enter the passcode. It's a hard knock life.

1

Google fixed the first issue a while back when it removed the second password prompt, which made us all happy.

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