23
Aug
NCI_Visuals_Food_Pie

We've been wondering what the codename for the "L" release of Android would be ever since KitKat was revealed, and today it looks like we've got more evidence in support of "Lemon Meringue Pie." Thanks to our own research and a submission from reader Yuku Sugianto, we've found multiple official sources in code and documentation that list the next release as "LMP," which can only refer to the delicious baked good.

07
Aug
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There is a really annoying bug in Android that makes your Home and Recents buttons disappear and prevents the notification shade from working. It only happens after flashing an OS update without wiping, but since I've now run into this issue at least 3 times after updating my Nexus devices, and it's a pain to find any info on how to fix it online, it's time for a quick post.

Specifically, I just flashed the updated LPV81C L preview build on top of LPV79 (again, I did it without wiping data - just open the flash-all script and remove "-w" to do so) and observed the Nexus 5 boot into this:

wm_Screenshot_2014-08-07-13-50-13

If the buttons disappear for you for the first time, you will be stumped.

07
Aug
nexusae0_apis_thumb3

The Android L release is the first time Google has offered a developer preview of an upcoming version of the platform, so no one knew how it would handle things. Would there be updates? Could we watch L evolve over time? It was unclear before, but now Google has posted new versions of the images for the Nexus 7 and Nexus 5.

wm_Screenshot_2014-08-07-13-50-13

06
Aug
nexusae0_jb-profiles-create-n713_thumb

Earlier today, someone decided to post to the Android issue tracker complaining about the lack of multiuser support for smartphones. Within a few hours, a developer at Google responded and closed the issue, remarking that "the development team has implemented this feature and it will be available as a part of the next public build." Sounds pretty definitive to us.

The "next public build" is the only ambiguous part of this statement, though that Googler is almost definitely referring to the "L" release of Android scheduled to land some time later this year.

30
Jul
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Google I/O 2014 has come and gone, but that doesn't mean great stuff from the conference isn't still coming out. The companion app used by thousands of attendees -and hundreds of thousands of fans and followers- has been open sourced! Code for the I/O app is meant to serve as an example of best practices for Android developers, providing fully functioning implementations of the latest design principles, UI controls, networking code, and more.

17
Jul
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Google I/O was pretty amazing this year, right? We got the deets on Material design, a preview version of Android L, the formal release of Android Wear, the first manifestations of Android TV and Android Auto, and plenty of other bits and pieces. However, all of that content and all of those developer sessions can take forever to absorb, and professional developers just don't have time for that. Now that all of the videos have been posted, I've combed through every last one to narrow the list down to just the sessions that absolutely can't be missed.

11
Jul
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There comes a point many, many months after the release of a new version of Android where devoted users just can't quash the desire to get their hands on an even newer version. A preview of Android L is already available for download, but unless you are willing to flash your device and put up with any number of potential bugs, I wouldn't recommend installing it on a phone you actually need to use.

10
Jul
nexusae0_letter-l_thumb1

Android L is going to be the biggest thing to happen to the platform since at least 2.0 – maybe even ever. Google is radically altering its design language and adding a ton of new features this time. Not only did we get a quick tour of the new OS at Google I/O a few weeks ago, Mountain View released a developer preview, which it's never done before. This is truly a new era for Android, and we've been keeping track of every little detail (some might say obsessively).

08
Jul
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Android is really turning into a jack of all trades, having become the OS of choice for phones, tablets, face computers, and now wristwatches. The combination of flexibility, open source code, and low cost of entry make it a prime candidate for countless utilitarian purposes. With the upcoming release of Android L, Google is aiming to make it even easier to deploy highly specialized environments with a new feature called Task Locking that allows a single app to take control of the interface and prevent users from switching apps or even seeing notifications.

07
Jul
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Android L still has a few tricks up its sleeve – specifically, in the Status menu. If you go to the About section of settings and tap on Status, Android L allows you to copy any of the values listed there with a long-press. Neat.

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