20
Jan
sonyericsson

Sony Ericsson posted profits of 35 million euros ($47.14 million) in Q4 of 2010, due largely to major downsizing combined with a shift towards Android-based smartphones. Although Sony Ericsson sold fewer phones overall, Android enthusiasts will be happy to hear that they managed to sell over 9 million Android-based Xperia phones, including the X10, X10 Mini, X10 Pro, and X8, since their launch.

In the last year, Sony has made significant changes after reporting losses of 836 million euros in 2009 ($1.13 billion).

27
Oct
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This morning Sony Ericsson posted a teaser video on YouTube explaining to X10 users the differences they will find in the update from Android 1.6 to 2.1. As painful as it is to watch a video of someone demonstrating five homescreens, slide-to-unlock  and live wallpapers like they're brand new features, the video underscores the growing expectation that an update will be released for the X10 within the next few days.

According to the Sony Ericsson blog:

(Note – It does have some wording on getting the update now – that is not yet really valid and it wasn’t scheduled to be released until the update is out there.

08
Oct
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The lucky folks over at French tech blog JournalDuGeek got themselves some on-wrist time with Sony Ericsson's OLED Bluetooth watch/remote/alert terminal. If you're not familiar with the device, check out our coverage of its official announcement in September: Sony Ericsson Outs The LiveView Remote For Android Devices...

JDG posted some rather blurry pics of the device, whilst also disclosing a price and rough release date: €59 in November. Considering Sony are known for "aspirational" pricing, this is very pleasing if true.

08
Jun
SONY-ERIC-X10-MINI__FRONT_LARGE
Last Updated: April 2nd, 2011

UK readers only: if you like adorable handsets running an operating system with an adorable mascot or, and perhaps more importantly, if you like free things, then you owe the X10 Mini a few minutes of your time.

It’s not the most powerful Android handset on the block, and hell, it’s not even running Android 2.1, for an attractive, and again, free, Android handset, it’s not a bad deal.

Of course, as with most free phone offers, it will require you to sign your soul away for two years with a new contract, but on the bright side, you have your choice of four carriers to deal with.

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