Android Police

Articles Tagged:

user data

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Google Safe Browsing will soon require apps with personal user or device data to provide a privacy policy, trigger warnings if they don't

Security is a big deal these days. Google understands this, which is why its Safe Browsing team is implementing even more mandates for applications. Apps that handle user or device data will soon have to provide their own privacy policies. If this requirement isn't met, warnings may be shown on users' devices.

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Google implements further changes for developers to help protect user data

Earlier in the month, Google released an official statement on a particularly virulent phishing email imitating Google Docs that was doing the rounds. That same day, coincidentally or not, an update to the Gmail Android app added a special warning page that pops up every time a link in one of the suspect emails is clicked. Now, Google is implementing further changes to help prevent future scams of this type.

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HTC Reaches Out Regarding Evo 3D's Suspicious Data Collection

There have been rumblings lately regarding suspicious data collection happening with HTC's Evo 3D. For those not familiar, it was recently discovered that a service in the latest update for the Evo 3D collected usage, location, and device information, causing some concern among users and developers alike.

Xda reported today on a statement made by HTC officials which attempts to quell fears surrounding the data collection, letting users know that the data is encrypted and all identifying information is excluded. Additionally HTC clarified that the data is related to opt-in error-reporting, and not simply being collected on a whim. Here's the full text of the statement:

We’ve seen some questions about Sensation and Evo 3D and want to provide more information.

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Déjà Vu: WSJ Study Suggests Many Android & iOS Apps Transmit User Data To Advertisers

Way back in July, Lookout released the results of a study on app security, and found that many apps have access to user data that they have no need for - suggesting that there was plenty of potential for illicit information use. Two months later, a group of researchers from Intel, Penn State, and Duke came forth with data showing just that: 15 of the 30 apps tested sent GPS data, 7 sent unique hardware information, and a few sent more private information such as phone and SIM numbers.

Fast forward to today - the Wall Street Journal has released the findings of a very similar study they conducted, and the results are surprisingly similar.

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