22
Jul
SuccessKid

When certain things finally happen, they make us want to search for that hidden ladder that takes people up to the rooftop and scream "Hallelujah," religious or no. This is one of those things. Google apparently no longer requires people with two-factor authentication enabled to sign in twice when setting up a new Android device or adding another account. Better yet, this change doesn't require Android L or anything fancy. Here's a video of the magic taking place on an HTC One M8.

21
Jul
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Users of newer versions of Windows or just about any Microsoft web service might be familiar with the company's rudimentary two-factor authentication system. If it's been a while since you've logged in or you're setting up a new Windows device, it might ask you for a verification code, accessible from a backup email account. Of course that can be a pain if you don't remember the password for that account, or simply don't want to dig it out.

24
Mar
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Tumblr has rolled out a new two-factor authentication option that, once enabled, decreases the likelihood of someone breaking into your Tumblr account. Rather than just a password, you will also need to type in a key generated by your Android device. We've already seen Google, Facebook, and Twitter implement this functionality, so while it's about time, it's also better late than never.

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You can enable the feature through your Tumblr settings page.

06
Aug
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Today's Twitter update has a keen focus on security. Back in May, the company introduced an SMS-based two-factor authentication system for signing into the service. Now login requests can be be verified using just the mobile app. Users can sign into Twitter and enjoy the extra security of two-factor authentication without having to provide a phone number or worry about cell reception. The app also generates backup codes just in case your phone isn't available when you want to sign in later on.

30
May
evernoteico

Whether we're talking about Twitter, Gmail, bank accounts, or anything else accessible on the web, account security is no joke. As a result, we're starting to see more and more companies take advantage of advanced security methods like two-factor authentication, which requires the user to not only entire a username and password, but also a code typically send via SMS to the user's cell phone. This means that a physical device must be accessible, making it much more difficult for would-be snoopsters to remotely gain access to an account.

26
Aug
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Several weeks ago, Dropbox suffered a small security breach that gave wrong-doers access to a few unlucky users' email addresses. On the good side, it also brought the vulnerability to the Dropbox staff's attention. Since then, they've been working hard to beef up security, and today, they introduced two-step verification.

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Much like Google's two-factor authentication, once enabled this requires you to login using two different sets of verification: your password and a unique identifier sent in either a text message or generated locally on the device using the authenticator app (which you have the option to get via QR during the set up process).