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Articles Tagged:

throttling

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What's Up With AT&T, Verizon, John Legere, And Netflix Throttling? A Quick Explainer

In the past day or two, you probably heard something along the lines of: "AT&T and Verizon are "throttling" Netflix." Originally, John Legere, CEO of T-Mobile, made a claim that led to such statements. Many outlets ran with the story, but AT&T and Verizon quickly and flatly denied any claim of throttling Netflix content - and AT&T and Verizon aren't exactly likely to lie about something like that in a public statement. This seemingly put Legere in a corner: did John have bad information? Well, it turns out the situation is a little more complex than all that, and while what John Legere said was technically true, it doesn't exactly ring that way in the practical sense.

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John Legere Apparently Thinks If He Explains Binge On To You One More Time You'll Agree It's Awesome

Okay, dummy. John Legere has been explaining Binge On to you for days, and you still don't agree with him that it's the best thing since sliced bread? Well, he's just going to tell you about Binge On again using the exact same words he's been using so far. These words are available on the T-Mobile newsroom site, where he can carefully craft an expletive-free message and apologize to the EFF.

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T-Mobile Loses A Binge On Partner Over Legere's EFF Blunder

T-Mobile and its outspoken CEO John Legere are taking an uncharacteristically defensive posture after questions arose about how the new Binge On video service throttles data. The fallout from Legere's EFF interaction yesterday is still going on, and it looks like it has cost T-Mobile a Binge On partner. Video commercial streaming service 4stream.tv has notified T-Mobile that it's pulling out of Binge On in protest of Legere's comments about the EFF.

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T-Mobile's John Legere Asked Who The EFF Is, And The Internet Is Telling Him (A Lot)

T-Mobile CEO John Legere gets away with the bombastic attitude and casual swearing largely because people like what T-Mobile has been doing. However, it looks like John might have miscalculated with Binge On. Following the video defense he posted earlier today, Legere started doing an impromptu Q&A on Twitter. He made the mistake of asking, "Who the fuck are you?" of the EFF. Now, the internet is letting him know.

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In Full Used Car Salesman Mode, John Legere Says Google Attacked Binge On Throttling To "Get Into The News"

In a video released today, John Legere - CEO of a publicly-traded wireless carrier and, apparently, your sort of out-of-touch uncle - accused Google, a $517 billion search company, of attacking T-Mobile's Binge On service in order to "get into the news." As to what Google's end in such an endeavor might be, well: John just doesn't know. It's shadowy, it's dark! They have an agenda.

In what is frankly an almost uncomfortably defensive clip, Legere's cultivated public persona continues to deny that Binge On's throttling of all video content is throttling. Instead, everybody's favorite wireless CEO focuses on the fact that you're getting more video!

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T-Mobile Really Doesn't Like It When You Call Binge On's Video Quality Throttling What It Is, Which Is Throttling

Listen, I don't really have a problem with Binge On itself - it's a pretty nifty value-add for T-Mobile customers that allows them to throttle all their video streamed over mobile data to 480p, in exchange for some of that video (Binge On partner services, like Netflix, but notably not YouTube) not counting against their plan's data cap. I consider this a "pretty fair deal." In exchange for reducing the burden of video bandwidth on T-Mobile's network, you get to stream all the [partnered] OK-quality video you want. It's nice!

But T-Mobile has come under fire - and I think rightly so - for the fact that Binge On is an opt-out service that does not explicitly disclose to subscribers just what they've automatically signed up for.

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YouTube Isn't Happy With T-Mobile's "Binge On" Video Quality Throttling, According To WSJ

T-Mobile has made some big changes in the last few years, but the way it manages data caps has worried some net neutrality advocates. Its last big announcement was Binge On, which exempts services like Netflix, Hulu, and others from data caps, but YouTube has now started complaining that T-Mobile throttles all video regardless of its participation in the program.

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[Update: Fixed] Google Photos Users Complain Of An Invisible Data Cap For 'Unlimited' Photo Uploads

The new unlimited upload function in Google Photos is undeniably generous. But the old saying that your mother taught you, "if something seems too good to be true, it probably is," would seem to be in effect. Android Police has received reports from multiple users that photo uploads from the desktop and various mobile apps have hard data restrictions, suddenly cutting out in the middle of the upload process after users pass an unspecified data threshold.

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WSJ: Sprint Stops Throttling Unlimited Plans Following New FCC Rules

The Federal Communications Commission is taking action, and wireless carriers are now on guard. Once the government department's new net-neutrality rules took effect on Friday, Sprint stopped throttling customers on unlimited plans, according to The Wall Street Journal. The carrier says its policy would have been allowed under the new rules, but it made the change anyway just to be sure.

Sprint

Sprint made this decision a few days before the FCC fined AT&T $100 million for making misleading promises of unlimited data. The carrier, which no longer offers such plans, throttled customers who went over unspecified data limits and didn't notify those affected.

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The FCC Plans To Fine AT&T Mobility $100 Million For Misleading 'Unlimited' Data Plans

It's been almost eight months since the Federal Communications Commission opened its lawsuit against AT&T for misleading statements on its "unlimited" data plans. Today the Commission announced its intention (PDF link) to fine the wireless company $100 million for failing to notify its customers that going over unspecified data limits on an "unlimited" plan would result in severely reduced or "throttled" speed, well below advertised speeds, violating the 2010 Open Internet Transparency Rule. "Unlimited means Unlimited," said FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief Travis LeBlanc.

The Federal Communications Commission plans to fine AT&T Mobility, LLC $100,000,000 for misleading its customers about unlimited mobile data plans.

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