31
Jul
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Attention, people of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland: you can now buy television shows from Google Play, both on the web and via your Android devices. Google threw the switch on the content earlier today, making the UK the first country to get access to TV shows on Google Play outside the United States. Content appears to be a decent mix of US and UK shows at the moment, though it's probably a bit anemic when compared to the US store due to good old-fashioned licensing issues.

31
Jul
Crr

Rumors about Chrome OS running on a tiny HDMI stick started leaking out a few months ago, but we were all wrong about what it was going to be. The Chromecast is not a shrunken down Chromebox – it's not even really a Chrome OS device in the strictest sense. The Chromecast is Google's latest attempt to be invited into your living room. It also might be the first one to succeed.

30
Jul
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Anyone paying $20 per month for a premium cable channel should probably be doing everything possible to take advantage of it. With that in mind, the new update to Showtime Anywhere has added live streaming of Showtime to the app, but it's only available if you're a paying subscriber.

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All the archived episodes of Showtime series are included, but now you can see what's airing on the Showtime East and Showtime West feeds.

26
Jul
ct

Google is not good at TV – despite having more money and super-smart engineers than you can shake a remote control at, the company has always stumbled in the living room. Google TV was a good idea, but it's suffered from poor support and various bugs. The Nexus Q meanwhile was killed before it even launched once someone inside Google realized it should never have been made at all. But this...

25
Jul
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YouTube is not the only source of online streaming video. In fact, there are certain vids you simply won't see on Google's streaming video site. For times like that, there's LiveLeak. The website doesn't work very well on a mobile device, but now there's an app. It's unattractive, and works in a somewhat bizarre way, but it's still an improvement.

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The LiveLeak interface is just a long list of videos in various categories.

24
Jul
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One of Google's problem areas has long been the living room, and the Chrome team looks to be coming to the rescue by leveraging the huge mobile device ecosystem. The Chromecast is a new device running a simplified version of Chrome OS. It enables you to get content from your phone, tablet, or laptop to a bigger screen. This is not a Chrome OS computer in a tiny package, but rather a smaller, cheaper, more capable Nexus Q.

01
Jul
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Just sitting around with nothing to do? Why not watch some TV on your Android device? The new Watch ABC app offers access to a large number of on-demand shows and even does live TV streaming in Philadelphia, New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Raleigh-Durham, and San Francisco. The obvious downside here is almost no devices are currently supported.

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27
Jun
NexusQ

Today's update to Play Movies introduces a sleeker experience for Android devices. Unfortunately, the experience is too sleek for the Nexus Q to handle. For the few of you that have one of those endearing little spheres, your movies are now joining your music as content you can no longer stream to the device.

NexusQ-Fail

With both Play Music and Play Movies support gone, there is little reason to continue using the Nexus Q.

15
May
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The Nexus Q has had a tough life so far – that goes without saying. Things just got a little worse for the handful of us that use (and enjoy) the Q though – Google has seemingly sliced streaming support from the latest Play Music update, further reducing the impact of the Q's admittedly very limited use case.

NQ

Some users have actually reported problems with Q streaming dating all the way back to mid-March, and Google today responded to a thread on its Product Forums with the following:

Hi everyone,

Thanks for taking the time to report this issue.

15
May
play music logo

At the start of this review, I was simultaneously excited and frustrated. Now I'm just plain excited. For a bit of context, I have been bouncing between cloud music services since Lala was still a thing. I had one simple desire: I wanted to pay a monthly fee for unfettered access to a large library of content, but still wanted to be able to bring my own. I know that $10/month is not going to get me every song in existence, but if I can pay for most music, and then supply the rest, I'll be happy.