27
Jul
samsung-logo

When a new device comes out or gets a new version of Android, one thing developers want need to ensure ROMs run as smoothly and efficiently as possible is the kernel source code. Samsung has been quite good about releasing source code for new and updated devices, and it has now made available the Ice Cream Sandwich kernel source for the AT&T Galaxy S II.

While that may not mean much for the bulk of the crowd in terms of actual usefulness, it's definitely good news for the development community.

15
Jul
xbmc logo

Earlier this week, we mentioned that the amazing folks behind the XBMC project are bringing the app to Android. Well, it's still very early, but would you like to see what it's gonna be like? Of course you do. If you've got a Nexus Q or an Android-compatible set top box, you can download the apk from our mirrors below. For the rest of you, here's what it looks like running on a lovingly hacked Nexus Q, courtesy of Cyanogenmod developer Jason Parker:

xbmcnexusq

The interface is still very much centered around arrow keys/a d-pad.

12
Jul
att-galaxy-note

Samsung has been on a roll here lately with the source code releases, and it just dropped the ICS kernel code for the AT&T Galaxy Note. That's definitely good news, because no sooner than the code had landed, the CM team went to work on CM9 nightlies for the device almost immediately and pushed the first one out just a little while ago.

image

Definition: A "nightly" is a bleeding edge release that is built on a daily basis, usually at night after a full day's worth of new code has been committed.

11
Jul
samsunglogo

Today is a good day, I think, for source code drops! Samsung has just released the source code for an update for the Epic 4G Touch, Sprint's variant of the Galaxy S II. The update (FF18) is said to be rolling out to devices right now as an OTA. If you want to get your hands on the kernel code to fiddle with it yourself before the update arrives, however, you can head to Samsung's download page here.

09
Jul
wm_GALAXY S III Product Image (6)_B

Last night Samsung released the kernel source code for the Verizon Galaxy S III. While it's good that Samsung is making good on timely source releases, this particular bit of code didn't do a whole lot of good in way of GSIII development because of the VZW GSIII's locked bootloader. Fortunately, Team Epic has changed this with a new workaround called kexec hardboot (kernel execution hard boot) that should allow users to effectively "sideload" custom kernels without having to actually flash them on the device by bundling the kernel with the custom recovery.

09
Jul
wm_GALAXY S III Product Image (8)_B

Around the middle of last month, Samsung published the source code for the AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint versions of the Galaxy S III to its Open Source Release Center. Mysteriously, the Verizon variant's code was nowhere to be found - until late last night, anyway.

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You can now find the kernel source for the Verizon GSIII alongside its brothers, thus rounding out the source release for the Big Four here in the U.S.

21
Jun
292559-samsung-galaxy-s-iii-sprint-back

Samsung has just dropped the source code for the Sprint version of the Galaxy S III, and it's available on Samsung's open source web portal here. Samsung has been surprisingly on-point with getting source code for the Galaxy S III here in the US, ensuring that custom kernels and ROMs will have the maximum amount of tweakability available to tinkerers from the likes of RootzWiki and XDA.

sgsiiispros

Samsung Open Source

04
May
asus300

Happy Star Wars day, everyone! ASUS got you a present: it's firmware updates with a side of source code! You can head to ASUS' site right now and download firmware version V9.4.3.17 for a few countries including the US, as well as version V9.2.3.23 if you're in Japan. Kernel source code for the TF300T is also available, in both x.17 and x.23 flavors for your downloading pleasure.

2012-05-04 12h30_57

Head on over to the source link and select "Android" from the dropdown box to get your downloads.

26
Apr
aosp

If you follow AOSP code drops long enough, you're eventually going to hear about JBQ (as well as a ton more acronyms). Jean-Baptiste Queru, Technical Lead of the Android Open-Source Project took to Google+ today to talk about Android update rollouts, as well as to praise one of the manufacturers that he sees as leading the pack in aiding the AOSP: Sony.

It took Sony only about 5 months to ship this [Android 4.0 for the Sony Tablet S] after I released the code in the Android Open Source Project at the very end of last year.

01
Feb
Samsung-Galaxy-Note

Source code. Galaxy Note. AT&T.

What do you get when you combine those three things? If you said "source code for the Galaxy Note on AT&T," then you win a cookie. Go wait over there and we'll bring it right out.

Samsung just pushed the source to its Open Source Release Center for all to grab, but there is a catch. For some reason, there are three different versions of the code, all basically identical, save one line (thanks for digging through the code, JCase).