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Partial AOSP Changelog Posted For Android N Developer Preview 2

The second round of N Preview factory images and OTAs are out and most people are updated. The team at Android Police HQ is still digging around to find all of the new additions, but in the meantime, there are a number of changes buried right in the source code. Google posted some of the source code for 'N' to the Android Open Source Project, and we've built a changelog from that commit history.

During the preview stage of a new OS version, Google usually limits the code it releases to just GPL-licensed projects. Unfortunately, that excludes most of the parts of Android where the big new features and UI changes would have happened, but don't count out those changes as boring, they can still contain quite a few interesting details if you look a bit closer.

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[Update: Added M5C14J] AOSP Changelogs Posted For April's 6.0.1 And 5.1.1 Security Updates

The factory images are up–some of them–so it's time to take a peek under the covers to discover any changes made to the Android Open Source Project for April's security updates. To make this a bit easier, we've generated changelogs based on the commit history that was just posted to AOSP last night.

As you might expect, the majority of the changes are going to be related to the issues set forth in the April Security Bulletin. A few others appear to be relatively small bug fixes, but nothing jumps out at me as a change that will directly affect user experience or any particularly noticeable bugs.

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Partial AOSP Changelog Posted For Android N Developer Preview

Are you tired of Android N already, or are you itching to get even deeper into the preview release? If you're leaning towards the latter, you may want to check out the changelog generated from a fresh code push to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). Don't get too excited, this isn't a complete platform release (confirmed by Bill Yi), so it doesn't include things like the changes to the notification shade. Rather, the changes uploaded yesterday are mostly for the GPL projects used in Android, and there are still plenty of interesting bites of knowledge to take away from those, as well.

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AOSP Changelogs Posted For March's 6.0.1 And 5.1.1 Security Updates

The latest factory images for the Nexus family have landed and people are getting their updates. What are they updating to? The changelogs built from developer comments can probably answer that, or at least give some pretty good hints.

Like most of the monthly updates, at least since Google started this practice, March's update focuses on security.

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Amazon Web Services Launches Lumberyard And GameLift, A New Twitch-Enabled 3D Game Engine And Scalable Gaming Service

As if Amazon doesn't have its collective hands in enough projects, Amazon Web Services has launched a new 3D game engine and a scalable service to make it easier for developers to build and deploy server-based multiplayer games. The game engine is called Lumberyard, a fully functional game engine based on CryEngine, it comes with a number of improvements and custom integrations. The service goes by the name GameLift and it's built on top of Amazon Web Services (AWS). Together, they are meant to bring new customers to Amazon's EC2 cloud architecture and drive increased usage and engagement on Twitch.

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AOSP Changelogs Posted For February's 6.0.1 And 5.1.1 Security Updates

February's batch of factory images started turning up earlier today and Google followed up with a push to AOSP a few hours later. As usual, we've got some changelogs to look over. The focus this month appears to be entirely on sealing any holes that could be used by bad people to do bad things.

Google posted a security bulletin with a list of fixes found in this release, and there are a few pretty big ones this month. Five items have been tagged Critical, including two that allowed for remote code execution without any user interaction, and the remaining three could have been used for privilege escalation.

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AOSP Changelogs Posted For January's 6.0.1 And 5.1.1 Security Updates

The monthly security update for January is starting to roll out to Nexus devices. Factory images turned up yesterday morning and now we've got some changelogs from the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) if you're interested in taking a deeper look at exactly how things have been tweaked.

Unlike the 6.0.1 release in December, this month's adjustments appear to be entirely focused on security fixes. Google has a bulletin describing the relevant security issues addressed with this release. There are also a couple of builds specific to the Pixel C, including one that appears quite large. Like some of the previous changelogs, this is merely because it technically starts from a base version (i.e.

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AOSP Changelogs Posted For Android 6.0.1 And December Security Updates

The factory images have landed and the OTAs are about to start rolling out shortly. As we already know, there are new emoji to fill out the Unicode 8.0 spec, band 12 support for T-Mobile, "until next alarm" for do not disturb mode, and a shortcut to launch the camera with a double-click of the power button. The December security updates are also an important part of the latest update. Of course, these aren't the only changes that take place, so we generate changelogs from the Android source code to find some of the other things going on with the OS.

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AOSP Changelogs Posted For November Security Updates And Nexus 5X / 6P

Google's monthly security updates are out in the form of factory images, and that means it's time for some new code in AOSP. Since these versions are dedicated to closing security holes, there certainly won't be any new features and the bug fixes probably won't have much effect on battery life or performance, but they will keep the baddies from treating your phone like it runs an old version of Windows.

A number of serious vulnerabilities were fixed in this release, including two critical issues that could be used for remote code execution. Details have been posted on the Nexus Security Bulletin.

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Google I/O 2015 App's Source Code Hits GitHub To Inspire And Educate Android Developers

Google releases an Android app each year providing Google I/O attendees with the schedule for the upcoming conference, and it uses the opportunity to show off how an Android app is supposed to feel. Then a couple months later it releases the source code, providing developers with a look at best practices. The source code for 2015's app has taken longer to arrive than last year's, but at last, it's here.

The Google I/O 2014 app arrived during the pre-Lollipop time when full material design wasn't yet possible on most Android devices due to the lack of the necessary APIs.

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