15
Jan
1

If you're one of the few who dropped the coin and got a Samsung Galaxy Camera, good news: the Galaxy Camera toolkit is available now over at XDA. This comes from developer mskip, who is also responsible for the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 7, Nexus 4, and Nexus 10 toolkits, so you can rest assured that it is about as stable and secure as they come.

With the software, you can easily install drivers, root the camera, perform a full Nandroid backup, and so much more:

  • Install drivers automatically
  • Backup/Restore a single package or all apps, user data and Internal Storage
  • Backup your /data/media (virtual SD Card) to your PC for a Full Safe backup of data
  • Root any public build (different options)
  • Flash Stock Recovery image to device
  • Perform a FULL NANDROID Backup of your system via adb and save in Custom Recovery format on your PC
  • Pull /data and /system folders, compress to a .tar file and save to your PC
  • Auto Update ToolKit on startup (donators feature)
  • Dump selected Partitions, compress to a .zip file with md5 and save to your PC
  • Install BusyBox binary on device
  • Rename Recovery Restore files if present
  • Download, Extract and Flash Stock Rom (full steps)
  • Flash Insecure Boot Image for adb mode
  • Flash Stock Boot Image back to your device
  • Create tar file to flash via Odin with 1-click process
  • Rip cache.img to zip file in CWM format
  • Install a single apk or multiple apk's to your device
  • Push Files from your PC to your device
  • Pull Files from your device to your PC
  • Set Files Permissions on your device
  • Dump selected LogCat buffers to your PC
  • Dump BugReport to your PC (if installed)
  • Help, Information Screen for various tasks
  • Mods Section to modify your device (increase bitrate for video, increase camera quality settings, fix permissions in Internal Storage)
  • Reboot Device options in adb mode
  • Change background, text colour in ToolKit

The Galaxy Camera Toolkit is for Windows PCs only.

14
Jan
image

Back in September, Samsung announced a new ruggedized mid-ranger for AT&T: the Galaxy Rugby Pro. Now, that phone you probably don't remember is getting Jelly Bean. It's pretty weird.

The update, which bumps this rough-and-tumble handset up to Android 4.1, brings many good things for the device, like Google Now and Project Butter, but it also includes some other enhancements and fixes:

  • Camera enhancements: New live camera and camcorder filters offer a range of camera effects, pause and resume while recording a video
  • Pop Up Play update: Easily resize or pause the Pop Up Play picture-in-picture video window.

14
Jan
image

In a lengthy, somewhat intimate retrospective piece posted today to Samsung Tomorrow, the electronics giant revisits the launch of the Galaxy SIII. Readers likely remember a launch that almost came off without a hitch, but which was tarnished by a "shortage" of Pebble Blue colored units. Following the international delay, Samsung said there'd be no delay for the Pebble Blue SIII's in the States, and all seemed to be well.

14
Jan
samsung-logo

One hundred million – that's a pretty massive number. And it's one that Samsung can now tout as a sales figure for the Galaxy S line as a whole. That's a combined number for the entire series: the Galaxy S, Galaxy S II, and Galaxy S III; no other Galaxy phones, like the Note, are included.

The original Galaxy S made its debut in June of 2010, with the Galaxy S II arriving just 10 months later – in April of 2011.

10
Jan
samsung-logo

Do you like octa-core processors? How about displays that curve? Or just Samsung in general? If you answered "yes" to any of those questions, then you're going to want to watch Samsung's second CES event, which just so happens to be available now on YouTube.

For the Exynos 5 Octa stuff, jump straight to 12:34. If you're more into the flexible OLED, they show the prototype off at 39:48.

10
Jan
1[8]

In order to further convolute the Galaxy series more than it already is, Samsung just brought the Galaxy S II name back from the dead by announcing the Galaxy S II Plus. The phone – which is already basically irrelevant – is a rehash of Sammy's 2011 flagship, albeit with a slight bump in spec and a new version of Android. Woo.

1 2 1[5] 4

  • 4.3" 800x480 display
  • 1.2GHz dual-core processor
  • 1GB RAM
  • 8GB storage, microSD card slot
  • 8MP rear shooter, 2MP front camera
  • Android 4.1.2 with Touchwiz

There's no word on when (or where) this nature-inspired resurrection will be available, nor is any pricing information available.

09
Jan
2013-01-09_13h11_21

Oh man, if you thought quad-core phones were crazy, your brain should prepare itself for at least twice as much explosion. Samsung just announced at CES its new Exynos 5 Octa processors. These chips, on a 28nm architecture (which means they're small and use less power) have eight dang cores. The company says that this will result in up to 70% battery savings (compared to what is unclear...we would assume the previous Exynos processor).

09
Jan
titanium

If the rather binary choices of blue and white for the current model of the T-Mobile's variant of the Samsung Galaxy S III don't appeal, there's another option available. A Titanium Grey color has popped up on Best Buy's website, at the same subsidized price as the other T-Mobile models, currently $179.99 with a two-year contract and a whopping $700 outright. Just be aware that if you actually buy a T-Mobile Galaxy S III at any time in the next month, your future self may come back Biff Tannen-style and smack you for being so shortsighted.

08
Jan
LTE_logo

T-Mobile is the smallest national US carrier, and it was also the last to announce a cogent strategy for the deployment of 4G LTE. Yes, after years of insisting to no end that HSPA+ is 4G, the magenta carrier is rolling out LTE. As part of that move, new phones are going to be needed. The first device designed for T-Mobile's LTE is a revamped version of the popular Samsung Galaxy S III.

08
Jan
2013-01-08_13h32_13

Have you heard of TransferJet? We won't begrudge you if you haven't. It's a fairly obscure bit of technology that hasn't managed to work its way into many consumer products, despite first launching to the public back in 2008. So, consider this whole article a bit of indulgent dreaming when we tell you about Toshiba's newly-announced micro-USB adapter that can add TransferJet capabilities to Android phones. What does that mean?

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