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robotics

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Anki OVERDRIVE: Fast & Furious Edition review: Just as good as the original, but with 100% more Vin Diesel

Anki is one of the biggest names in electronic toys right now, and for good reason; it's one of the few companies that has brought robotics to kids. This all started with its 2014 introduction of "Anki Drive," a more modern take on slot car racing that added weapons and artificial intelligence. "OVERDRIVE" was released in 2015 as a successor to Drive, and proved to be a market success. After all, it's the first Anki product I'd ever heard of.

Now, Anki has released a Fast & Furious edition of OVERDRIVE, which throws Dom Toretto's crew and cars into the mix.

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Cozmo Collector's Edition review: Still adorable, still fun

When I was young, I absolutely loved toy robots. I remember having a particular fascination for toys from WowWee, like the 'Robosapien' and the 'Roboraptor.' I managed to convince my parents one year to get the Roboraptor for my birthday, which I still own to this day. It was pretty basic by today's standards (the most advanced part of it was the IR sensor), but it was awesome at the time.

A few years later, I got my hands on the second-generation LEGO Mindstorms NXT. It was a robotics kit with pieces like IR sensors and motors, but it used LEGO's standard 'Technic' pieces.

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This home robot integrates with Amazon's Alexa and costs $2800

Robots are cool and, when designed and executed properly, robots can be quite endearing and awesome. But at $2800 a pop with very little added benefits, this one is definitely straddling the line to absurd territory.

Announced at IFA by QIHAN Technology (apparently a company specialized in AI and robotics), the Sanbot Nano is a 2.7 feet tall (848mm) robot that tries hard to look like a little kid. It has rotating head and arms, and is decked with sensors (IR, PIR, obstacle detection, touch sensor), 7 microphones, 250 lights, 2 tweeters and a subwoofer, a 3D camera, and a 10.1" touchscreen display.

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Sony's KOOV wants to teach your kids programming through robotics... via an Indiegogo campaign

Yesterday Sony Global Education launched an Indiegogo crowdfunding project for its newest educational initiative. Meet KOOV a programming and robotics kit for children. Think Legos meets robots (which is already a thing) but with better software and simpler hardware. With these tools, your kids can pick up programming fundamentals at a much earlier age. Perhaps little Suzy might be the next Wozniak or Stallman. Probably with less facial hair, though. 

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