Android Police

Articles Tagged:

remix

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Jide Technology shifting away from consumer market, Remix OS discontinued

There have been plenty of attempts to make Android a desktop operating system, with most of them not being very good. Jide Technology burst onto the scene with a Surface Pro clone running the company's own 'Remix OS' ROM in 2015, and later released a small desktop PC as well as a version of Remix OS for standard x86-based PCs.

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V-MODA announces the REMIX ($300), the world's first Bluetooth speaker with a built-in headphone amplifier

V-MODA announced the newest member of its audio product portfolio today, the REMIX, the company's first Bluetooth speaker. It's available for purchase starting today and retails for $300. Measuring in at around 8 inches long and 1.6-1.9lbs (depending on which finish you chose), the speaker is portable, but not petite. At $300, the REMIX is at the top end of the price spectrum for mid-size Bluetooth speakers but V-MODA feels the price is justified by top-notch sound and a couple of unique features.

The most compelling feature the REMIX offers is something you won't find in any other speaker on the market.

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Remix tries its hand at the mobile-desktop hybrid OS with Singularity

Jide's Remix OS is all about offering Android apps with a desktop interface, with a bonus of relatively cheap mobile hardware. And while the company has been expanding its reach into more retail products, the latest project it's showing off is probably its most ambitious yet. The "Singularity" system allows users to plug their phone into a monitor, connect a mouse and keyboard, and run the familiar Remix desktop interface while the phone is still operating in its standard Android mode.

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[Update: New Remix IO+ model] Jide's newest Remix IO gadget doubles as a desktop and an Android TV box, now on Kickstarter

Connecting a PC to a television isn't exactly a revolutionary idea. Ditto for a mobile device - it's harder to do now that dedicated HDMI ports are gone, but streaming screens and content via Chromecast has sort of filled the gap. Jide, the company behind the intriguing Android-as-desktop Remix OS products, is trying to take that rather niche idea mainstream with its latest hardware. The Remix IO is a gadget that's equally comfortable on your desktop or sitting inside your entertainment center. It's up on Kickstarter now for as little as $99.

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Remix OS now available as a virtual machine for Windows PCs

Jide's Remix OS has turned a lot of heads in the last couple of years, thanks to an interesting initial tablet offering and subsequent easy-to-install software for both PCs and a few Nexus tablets and even some retail hardware. The modified Android software, which uses a desktop-style window system for apps, is surprisingly robust and easy to use. Jide's latest move is to offer Remix as a virtual machine package, allowing Windows desktops, laptops, and tablets to run the Android ROM in a dedicated window alongside desktop applications.

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Remix OS Marshmallow now available for the Pixel C and Nexus 9

When the Pixel C was first released, there was a lot of speculation that it was originally intended to run a tablet version of Chrome OS instead of the Marshmallow build it eventually shipped with. There's still no easy way to get Chrome OS running on it, but today you can try the next best thing: the desktop-flavored version of Android developed by Jide. Remix OS, which was just recently upgraded to add code based on Android 6.0, is now available for the Pixel C. The Nexus 9, HTC and Google's 2014 offering, gets the same treatment.

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Hands-On With Jide Remix 2.0 For PCs: A Promising Start For Android On The Desktop

Despite Google's late attempts to compartmentalize its mobile operating system, the open source nature of Android remains one of its biggest strengths. Without it we wouldn't have marvelous projects like CM13 on (relatively) ancient Barnes & Noble hardware, or various Android-powered console emulators, or a hundred million $60 Walgreens tablets crowding Craigslist. (OK, that last one isn't marvelous, but you get my point.) And we wouldn't have Jide's Remix OS, an attempt to create a desktop-style operating system on the bones of Android. Remix is now on its third incarnation, and unlike the original I-Can-Certainly-Believe-It's-Not-A-Surface tablet or the recent and lamentably underpowered "desktop," this one is completely free.

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Redub, From The Developer Of Repix, Lets You Remix Videos And Dub In Your Voice

Video editing on mobile is still far from perfect - the complexity of the task and the limitations of a small touchscreen mean that getting anything done with precision is tricky. Apps with bite-sized editing like Vine are a good starting point, but we could use something to occupy the middle ground. Enter Redub, a video editing tool from developer Sumoing. It aims to bring a few much-needed tools (and an easy interface) to mobile video editing.

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Sumoing first caught our attention with Repix, a better and more effective take on the Instagram formula. Redub takes the same approach to video: keep the simplicity of more limited apps...

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[Update: Indiegogo Campaign Is Bogus] Remix' Big 11.6" Android Tablet With A Full Keyboard And Multi-Window Enabled OS Reaches Its $100K Kickstarter Goal In A Day

This isn't your typical Kickstarter. Jeremy Chau, one of the company's co-founders, states it clearly from the get-go in the campaign's introductory video. Remix isn't a bunch of over-promised under-delivered hogwash that may get stuck for years in the development and manufacturing process like 90% of Kickstarter products — it is a real tablet, it was demo'ed at CES, and it's already being sold in China.

Jide, the company behind Remix, is founded by 3 ex-Googlers — the magical words that instantly make any project more legit.

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[New App] Cross DJ Makes Your Android Phone Or Tablet A Miniature DJ Controller With 'Portal' Fashion Sense

Conventional wisdom says that mobile devices are for content consumption, but content creation is the realm of laptops and desktops. Sure, you see "created using nothing but an iPad" every once in a while, but if you're looking at something professional, odds are good that its creator used a reliable mouse and keyboard at some point. Then along comes an app like Cross DJ, challenging our notions of what can be done on a touchscreen and ARM hardware.

As you might have guessed from the title, Cross DJ is a DJ app. But this isn't just a way to create and edit your ever-growing collection of Zelda MIDI files - the app emulates and replicates the function of a real DJ controller, complete with live output and recording.

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