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Articles Tagged:

recall

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Samsung says half of recalled Note7 phones in US have been exchanged

As it turns out, people don't want to hang onto exploding phones. Samsung initially started the Note7 Exchange Program earlier this month in the United States, offering owners of affected Note7 devices the choice of a fixed Note7 or a S7/S7 edge. Over a week later, the CPSC officially began working with Samsung to handle the recall.

The program appears to be somewhat of a success, with the company reporting "about half" of the recalled devices have been exchanged. Samsung also revealed that 90% of customers exchanging their Note7 opted to receive a new Note7, instead of another Galaxy device.

Samsung didn't reveal any other details about the program, or exchange numbers in the United Kingdom & Ireland program.

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Samsung now has over 500,000 Galaxy Note7 replacements in the US, will be available tomorrow

Although the Galaxy Note7's tendency to explode has been a disaster for Samsung, it's hard to deny that they're doing a good job with damage control. A few days ago, the Korean company promised that replacement devices would be available no later than September 21st. Tomorrow's the 21st, so Samsung's evidently kept their word.

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Samsung begins Note7 Exchange Program in United Kingdom and Ireland

Earlier this month, Samsung began an exchange program for Note7 owners in the United States after a global recall was announced. The United States program allowed customers to exchange their affected device and either receive a fixed model when stock was available, or buy a Galaxy S7 or Galaxy S7 edge and receive a refund of the price difference.

Today, a similar program has begun in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Essentially all the details are the same, but this program only mentions returning affected Note7s to receive fixed models; details about switching to other Galaxy phones are missing. Samsung also reports that affected devices in the UK and Ireland will be updated to limit the maximum battery charge to 60%, similar to Note7 devices in South Korea.

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[RIP] Galaxy Note7 sales to resume October 21 in the US

The Galaxy Note7 roller coaster is not quite over yet. After reports of the phone's internal battery exploding, Samsung ordered the immediate recall of all Note7 devices worldwide. The Note7 Exchange Program was announced alongside the recall, asking Note7 owners to return their phones to receive fixed stock when it became available. Samsung is placing a high priority on replacing every damaged device first, before continuing sales of the phone to new owners.

VentureBeat has obtained a planning document pointing to October 21 as the official Note7 relaunch in the United States. That's a whole two months after the original release, August 19, and a month after replacement stock will become available to current owners.

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Samsung confirms that revised Galaxy Note7s will feature green battery icons in multiple places after software update

To differentiate potentially dangerous Galaxy Note7s from the safe, revised models, Samsung was reported as changing the battery indicator in the status bar from white to green on new models. However, that's not the only change the Korean company is making; Samsung Newsroom is now saying that the new indicator will also appear in other areas of the OS as well. Verizon's software update page for the Note7 confirms this.

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[Video] President of Samsung US apologizes for Note7 recall

The Galaxy Note7 recall, despite Samsung's best efforts, has severely hurt the company's public image. I do give Samsung credit for not only acknowledging that they messed up, but working as hard as possible to address the issue. Tim Baxter, President & COO of Samsung Electronics America, recently made a public statement on behalf of the company to address the Note7 recall.

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Revised Galaxy Note7s will feature green battery indicators in the status bar

In case you somehow haven't heard, the just-officially recalled Galaxy Note7 has been having some battery troubles - troubles that are leading to people and things getting burned. To differentiate the explosion-prone and revised Note7s, the Korean company is changing the color of the battery indicator in the status bar from white to green.

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Samsung and the CPSC officially recall the Galaxy Note7 in the US after 92 reports of battery issues

Samsung and the CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission) have just announced an official recall of the Galaxy Note7 in the US. This news comes after statements last week that Samsung and the CPSC are working together to issue a formal recall and reports that Samsung is limiting the batteries of Note7s in Korea to 60% via an OTA update. According to the CPSC, 92 reports of batteries overheating in the US have been received. This is out of an estimated one million units sold.

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Everybody calm down: that Brooklyn Note7 explosion reported by the NY Post was actually a Galaxy Core Prime

There's no denying that the Galaxy Note 7 recall is a big deal, but as with any big story, a little caution is called for when reporting on it. There are in fact other things that can catch fire besides the Note 7, including - gasp! - other smartphones. Such is the case with one of the more dramatic reports of a Galaxy Note 7 malfunction. As it turns out this New York Post article about a 6-year-old injured by an exploding Note 7 (which still hasn't been updated or corrected (update: see below)) is in fact about a Galaxy Core Prime, an entirely different Samsung phone model.

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Samsung will limit Galaxy Note7 battery charges via OTA in Korea to boost returns

The international recall of the Galaxy Note 7 is becoming a full-fledged disaster for Samsung, with millions of early devices (and consumers) affected. But even with the negative press and a direct hit to revenue, Samsung would prefer its customers send their faulty phones in for a replacement rather than face even a small possibility of said phones bursting into flames. In the company's home territory of South Korea, it's going to use some more direct methods of encouragement.

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