26
May
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Last Updated: May 27th, 2013

Stop me if you've heard this one before: Facebook has a privacy hole that exposes private information to the public. And it's a serious one, this time in Facebook Pages Manager for Android, which has been installed over 5 million times since January of this year. Let me explain.

Update 5/26/13 11:30pm PT: Rory from Facebook Security has informed me that the company is looking into the issue and "will try to get a fix up soon."

Update 5/27/13 06:28pm PT: Facebook patched the issue.

22
May
clueful

We briefly touched yesterday on Bitdefender's new privacy protection utility Clueful, but today we'd like to take a closer look at everything the app has to offer, along with what makes it stand out from the crowd.

For those who may not have caught yesterday's post (where we're also giving away two Galaxy S4 i9500s and two HTC Ones), Clueful is best described as a "personal privacy consultant" that offers full details of what your apps are actually doing behind the scenes.

21
May
clueful
Last Updated: May 29th, 2013

Have you ever wondered just how private your data is? How protected your personal info is? For all you know, apps could be running off sharing your phone number, contact log, and device ID to third parties. Or even worse, they could be doing so over an unencrypted connection. I shudder at the very thought.

This contest is now over.

The final results are listed below. If you've won, you will be contacted in the near future.

10
Apr
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"Burner" cellphones, pre-paid phones that are used and discarded, have become a handy way to protect your identity if you find yourself dealing with people you might not otherwise want to meet. Just lately it has become possible to get "disposable" phones without the phone, thanks to apps like Hushed, which provides a limited-use virtual number that can be easily substituted for your real one. Burner is a new competitor in the same vein, happily landing on Android after considerable success on iOS.

03
Apr
CyanogenMod-logo1

Update: So, scratch all that. Steve Kondik took to G+ today to say that CM will return the opt-out option and will not require users to share data. Though it's with a heavy heart, it seems. Expressing some exasperation, he had this to say on the matter:

It's incredibly frustrating that a handful of incredibly vocal users are ready to "fork" over the issue. News flash: there are already a hundred forks of CM...

04
Sep
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We've all had this happen: your phone rings and the caller ID shows only a number because the contact isn't in your address book. You've no idea who it is, so you reluctantly answer. Turns out it's either someone you don't want to talk to, a wrong number, a bill collector, or some other person you'd have rather avoided.

Before today, an app called Mr. Number could've made that scenario play out a little bit differently.

02
Jul
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One of the changes to the Play Store announced at Google I/O as "coming soon" was the ability for app developers to publish links to their privacy policies, thus making their intentions more transparent right out of the gate. By using Android apps, we allow a lot of personal information to travel through the tubes, and it's in everyone's best interests to disclose just what exactly happens to it in an open way.

22
Feb
android_privacy_investigation_580

Privacy is a good thing in the digital world - you'll get no argument from me. I don't like my data floating around in cyberspace without my consent, but I also realize that much of what makes the internet (and computing generally) so great is that I can use my own judgment to decide who I will and will not trust with my information.

Things like app permissions, which have been a part of the Android package installation process for quite some time, are nice, but let's face it: 95% of us don't read them.

30
Jan
Im-just-a-bill

Congress is a lot like a slot machine - once in a while, something good comes out. A new bill introduced by Representative Ed Markey of Massachusetts would require cellular carriers in the US to disclose to end users upon purchase of a mobile device any tracking software present on said device, or any such software that might be installed at a later date by the carrier, manufacturer, or OS provider (that would be Google for Android).

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