20
Nov
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We knew that YouTube Music Key would start rolling out this week, and it looks like it's in full force at this point. A bunch of us here at AP already have it, and from the look of our tip box, most of you do as well. If not, well, I'm sorry. Here's a quick look at what you're missing.

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As expected, we've got offline playback (you can choose to save the videos in 360p or 720p), background playback, and ad-free music videos.

12
Nov
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Guys, it's happening (....gif). The rumored YouTube music service that we've been hearing about for months is finally a reality. It's called YouTube Music Key, and it looks pretty great.

So here's the gist: it'll cost $7.99 a month (initially, at least - the price will eventually jump to $9.99), and includes full albums, background playback, offline viewing, and no ads. No ads. It's worth eight bucks a month just to get rid of the ads.

19
Aug
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Last Updated: August 21st, 2014

Update #1 (8/12/14): It looks like Google deleted the tweet embedded below. Between that and the lack of an update to this support page, someone might have pulled the trigger early. But if those countries don't have access yet, they probably will sometime soon.

Update #2 (8/19/14): After a false start last week, the Play Music expansion now seems to be live. The official Google Play country availability page has been updated to reflect this as well.

30
Jun
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If you haven't already abandoned one of those other streaming music services for Google Music All Access, today's the last day to do so for the introductory price of $7.99. As of tomorrow, July 1st, the price will jump up to the standard $9.99 per month, which rivals that of All Access' main competitor, Spotify. Unfortunately, All Access is US-only for now, so international users will have to wait for Google to roll the service out globally – hopefully they'll offer the same $7.99 incentive as it becomes available in more locations.

29
May
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When Google unveiled Google Play Music All Access earlier this month, they introduced the option to supplement our existing music collections with the millions of songs available through their service. What they didn't tell us was that those songs weren't as easy to remove from our libraries as they were to add. Sure, the web interface made doing so simple enough, but that isn't much use when a particularly jarring track makes itself known during the commute to work.

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