Android Police

Articles Tagged:

piracy

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United Kingdom Police Seize Android-Powered Set Top Boxes Pre-Loaded With Pirate Video Apps

Birds gonna fly, fish gonna swim, dogs gonna bark, and unscrupulous people are going to find ways to steal digital content. Video piracy is more or less unstoppable (though reasonable prices and more convenient streaming have taken it down a peg), but if you brazenly sell gadgets with the sole intention of stealing TV shows and movies, expect a visit from Johnny Law soon enough. Several shady retailers in the United Kingdom have reason to reflect on this today, after police raided multiple locations selling "Android TV" set-top boxes designed more or less as piracy machines.

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Amazon Screws Up, Removes Kodi Media Center From The Appstore For 'Facilitating Piracy'

OK, Amazon, I can sympathize with your plight. As both the legal operator of a massive software distribution service and a TV, movie, and music vendor beholden to various rights holders, you might be tempted to remove anything from your app store that even whiffs of piracy or copyright infringement. Hell, I could help you spot some examples if you want. But that really doesn't excuse booting legitimate, useful apps off of your store without a second thought, as appears to be the case with Kodi Media Center.

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Today Calendar Makes Pirate Users 'Walk The Plank' With Random Calendar Events

Piracy is a problem on any platform where installing software is easy, and that certainly includes Android. In a particularly egregious example, the developer of Today Calendar estimates that 85% of the users of the $5.99 premium version of his app have stolen it. What's a responsible Android developer to do? In this case, he's using a creative method to try and annoy illegal users into becoming paid customers.

Pirates who use Today Calendar will now be seeing some of what Jack Underwood describes as "Arrgh - Anti-Pirate Measures." Unlike most conventional DRM, the app won't shut down if it detects an unverified user.

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Android Piracy Site Operators Plead Guilty To Conspiracy To Commit Criminal Copyright Infringement

If you've been following the Applanet/Appbucket criminal case, you know that the Department of Justice and the FBI have been working on bringing charges against a number of high-profile Android app pirates for the last eighteen months. Earlier this month the investigations and arrests paid off, as two of the men responsible for large-scale Android app piracy in the United States pled guilty to conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement.

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US Department Of Justice Charges Four Alleged Android App Pirates With Criminal Copyright Infringement

Software piracy sucks. Ask any developer: app piracy is a major problem on Android, and more so on Android than on other mobile platforms, thanks to the relative ease of installing applications outside of the Google Play Store. But the United States Department of Justice is not turning a blind eye to mobile piracy. The Department charged four men with conspiracy to commit criminal copyright infringement earlier this week in Georgia's northern federal district court.

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State Of Security Report: The 100 Top Paid Android Apps For 2013 Have Been Cracked

Even casual observers of the Android ecosystem know that piracy is a big issue for developers. But if a report from mobile security company Arxan is to be believed, app piracy and "hacking" is incredibly prevalent, or at least prevalent enough that most of the popular apps are available in a pirated or cracked form. According to the company's "State of Security in the App Economy" report for 2013 (PDF link), the top 100 paid Android apps have been "hacked."

info

We used "cracked" in the headline because Arxan doesn't mention the purpose behind these hacks, so we're assuming that in most cases they're free, pirated versions of paid apps.

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Aliyun App Store Confirmed To Be Distributing Pirated Android Apps, Many From Another Pirate Site

A couple of days ago, we ran a story about a circulating rumor that Google had expressed strong concerns with the launch of an Acer phone powered by Chinese Internet firm Alibaba's Aliyun OS. As the post explained, Alibaba claimed that Google had warned Acer that releasing the CloudMobile A800 could result in the search giant "terminating its Android-related cooperation and other technology licensing with [Acer]." These rather strong words led to speculation over just what the issue could be with Aliyun, and whether Google had issued the warning at all.

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[Oh Snap] FBI And DoJ Seize Three Android App Pirate Sites, Including Applanet

One small and two major sites that have a long history of distributing pirated Android apps have been seized in a first of its kind operation conducted by the FBI, DoJ, and a variety of U.S. and foreign governments. These sites are:

  • applanet.net
  • snappzmarket.com
  • appbucket.net

seized

Each of the taken down hosts is now displaying this FBI seizure notice

According to PC World, FBI agents downloaded numerous copies of paid Android apps as part of the operation before seizing all three domains and executing nine search warrants on August 21st.

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[Whoa!] Google Will Start Down-Ranking Search Results That Receive Too Many Takedown Requests

This may not be strictly Android-related news, but it's safe to say that what Google does to search results is relevant to our readers' interests, no? Today, Google announced via its Inside Search blog that the company will start including the volume of valid copyright removal notices as a factor in determining how high or low a site ranks in its search results. Translation: pirate sites won't be removed entirely, but they'll start ranking lower than legitimate sites.

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[Editorial] Just How Bad Is App Piracy On Android Anyway? Hint: We're Asking The Wrong Question

When crowd-favorite zombie shooter Dead Trigger decided to drop its price from $0.99 to free, citing concerns over piracy, the tech world renewed its interest in an age-old debate: how bad is piracy for developers? Of course, any lost sale is money out of a developer's pocket (though it's important to distinguish between downloads and lost sales). However, the question should and needs to be answered: just how bad is the piracy problem on Android?

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