21
Feb
snapchattiny

If you've never heard of Snapchat, god! You guys are so behind the times! This app is like MMS and Mission Impossible all in one! Except it's not Mission Impossible because that's an old person show and who cares about Tom Cruise anymore? No time for watching movies when we're busy sending self-destructing pictures to each other. Set a timer on a message and, once it runs out, the recipient can no longer see your photo.

29
Jan
opentabletiny

OpenTable is a pretty fantastic app that can help you place reservations at restaurants nearby. While plenty of services let you find local eateries, few help you get in. Once you're seated and eating, though, what do you do? Enjoy your meal? Nah. That's for fancy pants. You should take pictures of your food! That's where Foodspotting comes in.

You see, Foodspotting takes the vanity of snapping shots of your dish and turns it into a service.

20
Jan
2013-01-20_20h10_25

You know what we like here at Android Police? Solid information. Earlier today, we reported on an alleged render of the HTC M7 that looked a little 'close-but-not-quite'. For starters, that image is not exactly the M7. But a helpful tipster decided to help us clarify some things today, by providing real images of something that more than likely is the M7.

wm_IMG_20130121_105044

We've been seeing a flurry of photos recently and this to be the most legitimate one yet.

14
Jan
2013-01-14_11h35_02

Forget skeuomorphism. Why do we need things that look like objects if we can just use actual objects? That's what reddit user and notable George Bruns ballad davy_crockett thought. Using a combination of Apex launcher's ability to resize the icon grid and MultiPicture Live Wallpaper to use multiple photos for different homescreens, he created a layout that's made up entirely of real-world things. Want to play music? Tap the headphones.

12
Dec
unnamed

Sony Digital Network Applications (Sony DNA) today announced Motiongraph – an app that aims to make the creation of cinemagraphs fast and easy for Android users. A cinemagraph, for those who don't know, is a still image with one or two minor elements animated (you can see some great examples here). They're a fascinating medium that can only be achieved digitally, and which have an eerie yet fascinating aesthetic.

Sony's app looks to give users more consistent and controlled results with a simple "rubbing" interface in which areas to be animated are identified by simply highlighting them with your finger.

09
Dec
nexusae0_app_thumb

The Google Play Store, as always, was abuzz with new apps last month. More than just new apps, though, the Play Store gained plenty of well-crafted, quality apps. The kind that have spurred the market's recent growth spurt, and which allow users to discover functionalities they never knew they needed. As always, we've sifted through all last month's new apps and selected our top five picks – a kind of short list for those looking to get the most out of their device with awesome apps.

06
Dec
snapseedtiny

There are no shortage of image editors on Android. Even Adobe, which makes the class-leading Photoshop, has a version of its editor on the platform. Today, though, Google gets one of its very own: Snapseed. You may recall this particular piece of software when it was demoed by NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang at CES this year. At the time, it was only available on the iPad where it had won App of the Year in 2011.

01
Dec
kwiktiny

Start with a base of Google+'s Instant Upload, mix with about three cups of Instagram (sans filters, of course), add a dash of personal Pinterest and what you'll get is a photo sharing app from Nero that serves 3-5 platforms. The company that you best know for including a free trial of something DVD-related on any computer you bought in the last decade has released a free Android app that automatically uploads any picture you take on your phone to its central servers and makes it available on any device you have the app installed on.

30
Nov
image

Samsung's Galaxy Camera, the manufacturer's first entry into the world of dedicated shooters powered by Android, was announced with little warning at IFA earlier this year. Besides Nikon's foray into the market, the Galaxy Camera is one of the only Android cameras we've yet seen. Frankly, of the two, Samsung's entry is the only one that seems worth looking at.

The question of how much longer point-and-shoot cameras can see success is a fair one – after all, DSLRs are becoming smaller and more affordable all the time, while smartphone cameras are reaching to fill the gap point-and-shoots would leave behind.

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