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performance monitor


Android Studio v1.4 Passes Into The Stable Channel With Improved Vector Drawable Support, New Theme Editor, Performance Monitors, And More

The first Android Studio v1.4 preview release came out just a short six weeks ago, and now it's moving into the Stable channel, right on schedule. The features remain largely the same as the original v1.4 preview, but a ton of bugs have been fixed and a few of the capabilities have been improved in some awesome ways.

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Android Studio v1.4 Preview 1 Enters Canary Channel With Brand New Theme Editor, Vector Asset Wizard, Performance Monitors, And More

With the official stable release of Android Studio v1.3 a couple of weeks ago, it's time to begin testing the next string of new features. The first preview release of version 1.4 is now in the Canary channel, and it's sporting some big new features. The Android Tools team has been working on the new theme editor first demonstrated in the I/O session titled What's New in Android Development Tools. There are also new performance monitors for GPU and network activity, a vector asset wizard for turning SVG files into XML vector drawables, and a few new lint checks.

Here is the Google I/O session video cued up to the beginning of the theme editor demo at 36 minutes:

Theme Editor


The new theme editor examines the styles in a project and displays visual samples of what controls should look like on a live interface.

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[New App] Chainfire's 'PerfMon' Is A Floating Performance Monitor With A Unique CPU Metric

We all know how useful floating apps can be, so an always-on-top performance monitor makes perfect sense for power users and developers. One such project just hit the Play Store from developer Chainfire, who has already brought us several other useful tools, like CFBench, SuperSU, and FAAPT.

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Simply called Perfmon, this is a floating application that can output certain metrics for monitoring purposes: foreground app, CPU, disk I/O, and network I/O. What makes this app unique, however is its CPU metric called CPU capacity usage. According to Chainfire, it "will take the CPU usage and scale it to what it would be if all cores were running at full capacity."

For example: if you have a 1.6ghz quad-core running a light app, it could be using 10% CPU with only one of the four cores active, and that core running at 200mhz.

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