22
Jul
SuccessKid

When certain things finally happen, they make us want to search for that hidden ladder that takes people up to the rooftop and scream "Hallelujah," religious or no. This is one of those things. Google apparently no longer requires people with two-factor authentication enabled to sign in twice when setting up a new Android device or adding another account. Better yet, this change doesn't require Android L or anything fancy. Here's a video of the magic taking place on an HTC One M8.

27
Mar
thumb

Just a quick update for Samsung device owners who, like me, found that the LastPass app fill was unable to fill any passwords after the very exciting 3.2 update. The latest version 3.2.3, which just popped up on the Play Store, specifically addresses this bug:

What's New

v3.2.3

Fix app fill on Samsung devices. Please contact our support staff if you still have issues.

I've confirmed that the fix indeed works by successfully logging into both the Amazon app and the Amazon site in Chrome Beta on my Note 3:

Screenshot_2014-03-27-11-41-24

Hooray!

16
Feb
sllogo

An international mega-corp like Google buys companies like the rest of us buy coffee. Google's latest latte is SlickLogin, a startup that aims to make authentication simpler and safer by using sonic login codes on phones. The details of the purchase aren't public just yet, but SlickLogin's site confirms that "the [team] is joining Google."

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SlickLogin's system is unique: it uses a cell phone as an authentication key with the help of nearly-silent audio codes sent via computer speakers.

18
Nov
unnamed (18)

For serious web addicts, sometimes Chrome just doesn't do it. Dolphin is one of the more popular and, more importantly, more consistent browsers available on the Play Store. But some Nexus 5 owners weren't happy to see that their favorite alternate browser had a killer KitKat bug: it couldn't zoom in with the standard pinching gesture. After a bit of time in beta, the fix has now been applied to the stable build in version 10.1.2.

28
Oct
image

Earlier today, the Nexus and KitKat crowds almost had collective heart attacks when they saw that kitkat.com/android was now password-protected and likely hiding something behind the locked gates. Possibly even all the complete KitKat details we've been dying to see (or whatever is left of them anyway). Could it be? Did the site go down for the big update, and the launch is imminent? Not so fast.

image

While the page does indeed pop up a login dialog, the revelation doesn't really mean anything just yet.

15
Sep
gps

When Google launched the Android Device Manager in early August, I applauded the initiative because we finally got a much-needed security solution that was built into every Android devices that ships with Google's services. Rather, it was a good start, since the functionality was so limited: location, remote wipe, and alarm.

For the last two days, I've been digging around the new Google Play Services APK 3.2.64 that started rolling out to Android devices everywhere.

15
Feb
xfinity-android-app

Before you panic, you should know that this isn't a huge deal, and Comcast is aware of the situation and has promised a fix "within a week or two." There, feel better? Good, because if you use the XFINITY app, any other app that has permission to read logs can read your Comcast username and password (aLogCat, for example).

The details, courtesy of aBSuRDiST, who discovered the issue:

My system log shows <userName>[email protected]</userName> and <password>MYPASSWORD</password> on a line that starts with "D/HTTPManager".

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