27
Oct
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Now that we've seen Samsung's Galaxy Note II go up for grabs at T-Mo, Sprint, and US Cellular, it's time we began expecting to see Samsung drop kernel source code for the carriers' respective variants. That's just what Sammy has done, recently releasing the open source kernel files for SGH-T889, SCH-R950_USC, SPH-L900_SPR, and a bonus device – AT&T's Galaxy Rugby Pro, lovingly called SGH-I547_ATT.

03
Oct
amazon appstore

Amazon, in an effort to continue expanding its services globally, announced today that its Android app distribution service, the Amazon Appstore, is heading for Japan.

The shopping and media giant is now inviting developers to submit their apps and games for distribution in Japan, giving them the chance to participate in a new market with Amazon and "expand their business." Jim Adkins, VP of the Appstore, explained:

Opening our portal to app and game developers looking to reach Japanese customers is an important milestone as we strive to serve consumers and developers globally.

15
Jul
galaxysiiiblue

Verizon has taken some flack lately for being the only US carrier to lock the bootloader. Workarounds have been implemented, but Samsung's taken it a step further by announcing a developer version of the device. Today they...well, they haven't quite made good on that promise, but they have created a landing page for the device on their site that announces the 32GB Pebble Blue version will be "coming soon".

18
Jun
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Just over two weeks after the official Galaxy SIII announcement, and days before its target launch date, Samsung has released the ICS open source files for AT&T's own Galaxy SIII (otherwise known as SGH-I747M), as well as T-Mobiles variant - the SGH-T999V. These releases are in keeping with Samsung's recent pattern of timely source code drops, which has certainly been encouraging for developers looking to tinker with one of the hottest Android devices available.

19
Mar
htc-sensation-4g-phone (1)

Just under a week after starting the Sensation's Ice Cream Sandwich Rollout, HTC has dropped the ICS kernel source for the Sensation, Sensation XE, and Vivid, much to the delight of their respective development communities. This news follows hot on the heels of Samsung's Galaxy SII kernel source drop, and seems to suggest a promising pattern among the two manufacturers of maintaining punctuality in releasing source.

For the many developers who have been prodding HTC to release the source since the devices' ICS updates started rolling out, this is great news, and should give a jolt to Sensation and Vivid development.

21
Jan
AppInvBlue

Looks like we missed it, but back in December of 2011, Google officially stopped developing App Inventor (it was a result of the company’s shutdown of Google Labs), allowing MIT to take the reins of a very similar project. Today, that project went open source, and though there’s very little in the way of documentation or guides, you can download the code now and begin modifying the Inventor.

Additionally, MIT hasn’t yet opened its servers, so you’ll have to find your own place to upload your modified version(s) of the file – but hey, if nothing else, at least MIT deems you “free to use the term ‘App Inventor’ and the puzzle-piece Android logo” in your work.

07
Jan
soulcraftthd_appicon_thumb

Remember SoulCraft THD, the awesome action RPG game we mentioned last month? Well, the open beta finally hit the Android Market today, bringing angels, demons, apocalypse, and rich, realistic environments to your Tegra device. Check out the video below for a taste of the action:

SoulCraft THD allows you to play as an angel (with human and demon options coming later), taking part in a compelling story, set at a time when humans are on the brink of discovering the secret of eternal life.

19
Oct
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Let's get the preliminary question off the plate first: who is Matias Duarte? Well for one thing, he oversaw the designing of a few small projects such as webOS, Sidekick OS, and Helio (the little carrier that could... be bought out). And, oh yeah, he also played a large part in Honeycomb's development.

Yesterday he sat down with Joshua Topolsky of This is my Next (soon to be The Verge) to discuss the "philosophy" of Android and, more specifically, Ice Cream Sandwich.

19
Oct
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Since I'm seeing questions inquiring about Android 4.0's source code drop every 5 minutes here and there, I thought it would be a good idea to point out this blurb in a recent post by an Android engineer Dan Morrill, aka morrildl:

  • To reiterate, these servers contain only the ‘gingerbread’ and ‘master’ branches from the old AOSP servers. We plan to release the source for the recently-announced Ice Cream Sandwich soon, once it’s available on devices.
  • 19
    Oct
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    At the end of today's Ice Cream Sandwich unveiling, we found out that the ICS SDK (API 14) was available immediately, but a much more important bit - the source code - was not mentioned at all. It didn't really come as a surprise - historically the source was released about a month after the SDK (with the exception of Honeycomb), but I'd like to clarify something right away for those confused between the SDK and the source code.

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