Android Police

Articles Tagged:

on-screen buttons

...

On-Screen Navigation Buttons And Failed Expectations: A Visual Analysis

Honeycomb, the first Android version designed specifically with tablets in mind, was released way back in February 2011. It was built exclusively for large screens and was never meant to reach phones, but it paved the way for Ice Cream Sandwich, arguably one of the most significant updates to ever hit Android. Taking several cues from Honeycomb, Android 4.0 brought about some of the biggest changes to the OS, not the least of which was the advent of virtual or on-screen navigation buttons.

At the time, the use of virtual buttons on phones polarized opinions: some hated the idea while others were quick to sing its praises.

Read More
...

Sony Replaces Google's Navigation Buttons With Misaligned Alternative In Xperia Lollipop Screenshots

A few images of Lollipop running on an Xperia phone have hit the web, and the most noticeable takeaway is what Sony has done to the navigation buttons.

The full-size screenshots can be found over in the original XperiaBlog post. All we care about is what's visible at the bottom of each. To put things simply, Sony has changed the icons, and not necessarily for the better.

Here are the on-screen navigation buttons on a Nexus device.

Nexus

And here's what we're shown on an Xperia device running Lollipop.

Screenshot 2015-01-22 at 2.39.48 PM

In place of the circle that Google uses as the home button, Sony has inserted a house.

Read More
...

Full!screen Enables Full Screen Apps Without Losing Navigation And Notifications (Root Only)

Okay, so this app isn't "new" in the traditional sense of the word, but it's kind of new and very cool. Full!screen lets you hide the system navigation bar and notification area on your Android phone or tablet so you can use that space for apps and games in full screen mode. It's not just crashing your system UI, though. Full!screen places minimalist replacement buttons tucked away in the corners.

1 2

3 4

Full!screen has a ton of settings that allow you control every aspect of your device's navigation behavior. You can use swipe gestures, pop-out pie menus, and long-presses to access different functions.

Read More
...

Unannounced Motorola Device On Sprint Leaked: Features QWERTY Slider, ICS, And On-Screen Buttons

It seems Motorola is having a tough time keeping its upcoming releases under wraps. First, a press shot of the Dinara (believed to be the Atrix 3) was leaked, and now somebody grabbed a shot of an unannounced Motorola device heading to Sprint.

Similar to the Dinara leak, the device seems to be running a fairly light version of Motorola's custom skin. While some icons are changed it appears that the Android 4.0 launcher remains mostly intact. Also similar to the Dinara is the presence of on-screen buttons. But this unnamed phone's biggest differentiator is a sliding, 5-row QWERTY keyboard.

Read More
...

Editorial: Why On-Screen Virtual Buttons In Android Ice Cream Sandwich Will Be Great

Ice Cream Sandwich will be the first phone version of Android to support virtual buttons. It seems like a lot of people don’t "get" the whole idea behind them. If used correctly, virtual buttons will be way better than the painted on Back/Home/Menu/Search we have now. So I figured I would lay out the benefits for everyone and hopefully start a nice discussion.

For starters, virtual buttons are much better UI

  • They can change orientation with the phone so they are always in the same place.
  • Situational buttons (like Menu and Search) can disappear when they are unusable. You’ll no longer have to guess if Menu will do something.
Read More