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The Galaxy Nexus, Long Abandoned By Google, Now Enjoys A Taste Of Lollipop In CyanogenMod 12.1 Nightly

The Galaxy Nexus is nearly as old as the Nook Tablet that CyanogenMod resurrected a couple of days ago with CM13, but it won't be getting that fresh of a software update. It'll have to do with a slightly older version of Android, but any third-party development on this forgotten Nexus is a welcome change from the state that Google left it in.

Officially, the Galaxy Nexus was abandoned at Android Jelly Bean 4.3. When KitKat was released in September 2013, two years into the Galaxy Nexus' lifespan, the phone wasn't deemed worthy of the new dessert flavor (allegedly due to the TI chip), but CyanogenMod's team of zealous and reckless developers braved the elements and kept supporting it with CM11 nightlies and snapshots.

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[Update: CM9 Stable For All Devices Coming Tonight] GSM Galaxy Nexus (Maguro) Becomes The First Device To Reach CM9 Stable Release

Update: A post just hit the CM blog verifying what we all suspected: CM9 Stable for all devices will be rolling out tonight. As previously mentioned, this marks the end of development (aside from bug fixes) for CM9 so the team can focus on CM10.

The post also notes that the Maguro build that hit last night actually went up by mistake and shouldn't have been posted until tonight. As a result, a new build ( will go live with the rest of the stable releases tonight.

Slowly but surely, the CyanogenMod team has been working towards the stable release of CM9 (which is based on Android 4.0).

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Verizon Galaxy Nexus Is Closer Than Ever To Full AOSP Support - But It's Not There Yet

Earlier today, the Jelly Bean source code rolled into AOSP (Android Open Source Project). This is a big deal - one we've been waiting for since the great Google I/O unveiling. What does it mean exactly?

It means that ROMs that are built from AOSP, like CyanogenMod, can now start integrating the Jelly Bean code and release the first true JB nightlies. Not broken ports from the Galaxy Nexus builds - real ROMs. They can also work out bugs because they can see the source code.

Manufacturers can now start working on updating their devices to the actual Jelly Bean release - remember, Google was still working on the final touches to JB when they released the preview, so even OEMs didn't have what rolled out today.

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