Android Police

Articles Tagged:

legal

...

[Update: Ban Lifted] Brazilian Judge Orders 48 Hour National Ban On WhatsApp, Users Flock To Telegram

Telecom operators in Brazil have been working for months to undermine the legality of WhatsApp, and now a judge in Sao Paulo has apparently agreed with the arguments. Starting at 9PM ET this evening, WhatsApp was blocked in Brazil, and will continue to be blocked for 48 hours. Mobile operators have said they will enforce the block (probably while high fiving each other). What will happen in 48 hours is unclear, but you can bet Facebook has multiple planeloads of lawyers on their way to Brazil.

Read More
...

Russia's Anti-Monopoly Agency Says Google Must Alter Its Contracts With Russian Carriers Or Face Fine Equal To 15% Of 2014 Revenue

Acting on a complaint by Russian search giant Yandex, Russia's antitrust authority has ruled that Google's policy forbidding the pre-installation of competing search providers on GMS-enabled devices is illegal in the country. Yandex, who dominates the huge Russian market on the desktop, has been hemorrhaging market share in mobile to Google. Their complaint is that Google cannot have a rule requiring Google be the default (and only) search engine on devices that ship with the Play Store.

Read More
...

Vague FTC Anti-Trust Probe Targets Android, Probably Because The FTC Has No Idea How Android Works

In the beginning, there was Android. Android was an open-source, largely hardware-agnostic operating system designed to work on a variety of devices and form-factors, and then Google bought the company that made it (also called Android, founded by Andy Rubin). Then, there was Google's Android. Google's Android was still open source, but now it came with stuff you'd actually want to use. Like an app store. And Google Maps. And Gmail. And Google Search.

Read More
...

AT&T Files Lawsuit Against Former Employees For Allegedly Giving Third Party Company The Ability To Carrier Unlock Phones

We like to (deservedly) give AT&T a lot of grief around here, but it looks like they have a case in their latest lawsuit. According to the legal documentation, AT&T has evidence of several employees having engaged in a scheme to illegally obtain unlock codes for AT&T customers that were still under contract. Why would they do that? Well, the lawsuit alleges they were taking money from Swift Unlocks, a web-based company that charges a small fee to unlock people's carrier smartphones.

Read More
...

US Patent Office Overturns Infamous Apple iPhone Design Patent, Samsung May Not Be Paying Apple Much After All

While it's not the "rounded rectangle" iPad patent of fame, the iPhone 3G design patent is easily the second most-famous Apple design patent of record. It's called D618677, and it was a key issue in Samsung v. Apple "round one" - and by "key issue," I mean "reason for most of the remaining half billion dollars in damages." According to the USPTO, that iPhone design patent is now invalid on multiple counts of obviousness in light of prior art (in a technical, not literal, sense - two very different things).

Samsung was deemed to infringe this patent by a jury, and while it may well have were the patent valid, the USPTO is saying the point is moot - the patent itself is not eligible for protection.

Read More
...

Unsurprisingly, AT&T Thinks They Should Not Have To Pay $100 Million FCC Fine For Misleading 'Unlimited' Data Subscribers

AT&T, who prefers to keep as many $100 millions as they can, has strongly suggested to the FCC that the carrier should not be required to pay the $100 million fine levied for throttling users on unlimited data plans. The punishment comes for failing to make it clear to customers that have grandfathered packages that while their service is called "unlimited," they will actually be throttled to 2G speeds once monthly usage exceeds an arbitrary amount that is not disclosed to subscribers.

To sum up AT&T's rebuttal, they say that the FCC is wrong about the current law and wrong about whether AT&T informed their customers about how unlimited data plans work.

Read More
...

Google Wins Yet Another Dismissal Of Privacy Lawsuit, This Time Is Probably For Good

A long, winding lawsuit brought against Google by a small group of consumers was dismissed by a federal judge in California on Wednesday. Plaintiffs accused Google of breaching its own privacy policy by sharing user data indiscriminately, more recently focusing on the amount of personal data shared with app developers through the Play Store. For instance, Alice Svenson says far too much private data was shared with the developer of YCDroid when she bought the app for $1.77.

That information included her home address and zip code, phone number, and email address. After the lawsuit was filed, Google began limiting the data shared with developers.

Read More
...

US Appeals Court Sides With Samsung, Reverses $382 Million Of $930 Million Apple Verdict

It seems like ages ago that Apple and Samsung finished duking it out in court over Samsung's "borrowing" from Apple's early iPhone designs. However, the $930 million judgement against Samsung was just the beginning of the legal tussle. This whole time the lawyers have still been racking up billable hours, and now a US appeals court has reversed a big chunk of the damages saying Apple's trademarks on the look of the original iPhone aren't valid.

Galaxy_S_vs_iPhone_3GS

Read More
...

Shake Is A Mobile App That Handles Legal Mumbo Jumbo For Freelancers And Small Businesses

In the Android community, there are a ton of freelancers working together to get stuff done. Whether it's a graphic design artist contributing to apps or websites, video editors helping with game trailers, developers hoping to create the next big thing, or writers churning out content for blogs (yours truly), the mobile space is filled with independent types coming together to accomplish great things. In our space, and in the broader world at large, freelancers need to sign agreements and write up documents that help guarantee payment and assign ownership of work. This legalese can require years of schooling or a personal lawyer to draft up, but there are ways to save the time and effort.

Read More
...

[Oops] NVIDIA Name Drops 'HTC Nexus 9' In Legal Docs

There was an interesting little tidbit buried in the legal filings related to NVIDIA's patent suit against Qualcomm, which was just announced last week. The issue surrounds various GPU technologies that NVIDIA says Qualcomm is using without a license. More interesting than all that legal mumbo-jumbo is what NVIDIA had to say about an upcoming Tegra K1 device—the HTC Nexus 9. Yes, they actually said it.

nexusae0_wm_V-Overall_thumb2

Read More
Page 1 of 1012345...10...Last»
Quantcast