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Samsung now faces class action lawsuits in US and South Korea over Note7 debacle

Though Samsung's Note7 is now officially off shelves, the headaches are not yet over. Beyond the continued, embarrassing efforts to keep the phones off of planes and the expected loss of over $3 billion, Samsung will now be dealing with legal troubles related to the Note7 as well. Consumers in the United States and South Korea have just announced their intent to file class action lawsuits.

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Qualcomm is filing actions against Meizu in US, Germany, and France

Back in June, Qualcomm filed a patent complaint in China against Chinese phone manufacturer Meizu. They had claimed that Meizu used several of Qualcomm's patents related to 3G and 4G communications without licensing them. Qualcomm claimed they tried to enter negotiations with Meizu before taking legal action, but were not able to reach an agreement.

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[Update: Brazil court freezes $11.7M of Facebook funds] Judge in Brazil orders WhatsApp blocked once again

WhatsApp is hugely popular in Brazil where mobile subscribers pay high rates for cellular calls and messaging. WhatsApp isn't getting as much use today as a Brazilian judge has ordered the country's five wireless providers to block access to the service. Unlike past blackouts, this one does not include an end date—it's intended to continue until WhatsApp complies with a court order to turn over information. However, it says the requested information doesn't exist.

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Federal Judge Finds Amazon Was At Fault When It Billed Parents For In-App Purchases Made By Kids

Here's a bit of a blast from the past. A federal judge has decided that Amazon was in the wrong when it billed parents for in-app purchases made by their kids on its Appstore platform. Both Apple and Google settled this case with the Federal Trade Commission two years ago, but Amazon wanted its day in court. It didn't go so well.

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Google & Microsoft Mutually Agree To Stop Tattling On Each Other To Regulators

Google and Microsoft, while not outright enemies, have been engaged in a number of public slap-fights over the years. After all: they're competitors, and Google competes with Microsoft in three areas where the company's fortunes have sharply declined (smartphones, the browser wars) or never really got off the ground to begin with (search).

Microsoft has even been engaged in lawsuits against Android and, under threat of legal action, extracted (and may continue to extract) royalties from companies that make Android devices. Microsoft also helped lead the charge in what was likely the impetus that eventually caused the European Commission to file antitrust charges against Google last week.

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The One Part Of The EU's Antitrust Suit Against Android I Can Actually Agree With (Opinion)

Today, the EU filed antitrust charges against Google related to the Android mobile operating system. The internet is absolutely alight - both for and against the allegations the European Commission has levied at our favorite search company that also makes our favorite mobile operating system. The key complaints boil down to three core ideas.

  1. Google requires manufacturers to bundle Google Chrome and Google Search, and set Google as the default search provider on their devices if they are GMS (Google Mobile Services) partners. This, allegedly, reduces competition for apps that perform similar or identical functions.
  2. Google does not allow manufacturers to both be GMS partners and produce incompatible "forks" of Android on other, non-GMS devices.
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[Update: Ban Lifted] Brazilian Judge Orders 48 Hour National Ban On WhatsApp, Users Flock To Telegram

Telecom operators in Brazil have been working for months to undermine the legality of WhatsApp, and now a judge in Sao Paulo has apparently agreed with the arguments. Starting at 9PM ET this evening, WhatsApp was blocked in Brazil, and will continue to be blocked for 48 hours. Mobile operators have said they will enforce the block (probably while high fiving each other). What will happen in 48 hours is unclear, but you can bet Facebook has multiple planeloads of lawyers on their way to Brazil. WhatsApp founder Jan Koum is certainly not amused.

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Russia's Anti-Monopoly Agency Says Google Must Alter Its Contracts With Russian Carriers Or Face Fine Equal To 15% Of 2014 Revenue

Acting on a complaint by Russian search giant Yandex, Russia's antitrust authority has ruled that Google's policy forbidding the pre-installation of competing search providers on GMS-enabled devices is illegal in the country. Yandex, who dominates the huge Russian market on the desktop, has been hemorrhaging market share in mobile to Google. Their complaint is that Google cannot have a rule requiring Google be the default (and only) search engine on devices that ship with the Play Store.

Now, Google never prevents people from downloading a different search provider from the Play Store. From the perspective of Yandex, though, Google dominates the mobile market so much that this policy is an abuse of their power.

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Vague FTC Anti-Trust Probe Targets Android, Probably Because The FTC Has No Idea How Android Works

In the beginning, there was Android. Android was an open-source, largely hardware-agnostic operating system designed to work on a variety of devices and form-factors, and then Google bought the company that made it (also called Android, founded by Andy Rubin). Then, there was Google's Android. Google's Android was still open source, but now it came with stuff you'd actually want to use. Like an app store. And Google Maps. And Gmail. And Google Search. And did I mention Android itself was and is still open source? Because it was and is, and will continue to be likely for many, many, many years into the future.

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AT&T Files Lawsuit Against Former Employees For Allegedly Giving Third Party Company The Ability To Carrier Unlock Phones

We like to (deservedly) give AT&T a lot of grief around here, but it looks like they have a case in their latest lawsuit. According to the legal documentation, AT&T has evidence of several employees having engaged in a scheme to illegally obtain unlock codes for AT&T customers that were still under contract. Why would they do that? Well, the lawsuit alleges they were taking money from Swift Unlocks, a web-based company that charges a small fee to unlock people's carrier smartphones.

The nearly-defunct two-year contract model that all carriers once used was built on the premise of making top smartphones more affordable up front.

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