27
Jun
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Getting access to kernel source code is a big deal for developers. It has a lot to do with getting all the neat features to work in your favorite ROMs. You might not swoon when Samsung drops the code for new devices, but you should be happy someone does. This time it's the bizarro Galaxy S4 Zoom that's hitting Samsung's open source site.

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25
Jun
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Kernel source code is an important part of a ROM developer's everyday life. It's what enables them to bring new features to your favorite device. What gives them with the opportunity to improve battery life, overclock (underclock) the processor, and so much more. For the average Joe, it's no big deal; for developers, however, it's a valuable asset.

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Today, Samsung has made available the kernel source code for some of its new LTE devices: the Galaxy S 4 Active on AT&T and Note 8.0 LTE.

24
Jun
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A new device has just popped up on Samsung's open source site with the enticing model number GT-i9505G. For those not keeping track, the Snapdragon-packing Galaxy S4 is the GT-i9505. Samsung may have just dropped the kernel source for the Google Edition GS4 before the device is even out.

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The same model number is also appearing in the Bluetooth registry, and there is a new WiFi Alliance certification for it. The hardware listing does look identical to the standard Galaxy S4, but that doesn't necessarily prove anything.

21
Jun
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It's not just the high-end Galaxy S4 that deserves to have it's kernel source plastered all over the internet. Budget handsets might as well get the same treatment. To that end, Samsung has posted the code for its Galaxy Ace 3 Duos and Galaxy Amp.

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20
Jun
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It was way back in early May that the kernel source for Sprint and US Cellular Galaxy S4 variants showed up on Samsung's servers. The Virgin Mobile Canada edition was added in April. The Verizon and AT&T devices came in the following weeks, but no peep from the T-Mobile version. Well, until today – Samsung just posted the T-Mobile GS4 kernel source in all its glory.

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17
Jun
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HTC must've been doing a bit of spring (read: summer) cleaning when it suddenly stumbled across some source code that should've been released to the public ages ago. First up is the AT&T HTC One's kernel source, which was nowhere to be found back in late April when all other One variants' source hit the scene.

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What's even more interesting, however, is that the company also released the Thunderbolt's ICS kernel source.

17
Jun
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There's nothing like a fresh batch of source code to get you through another Monday morning. Samsung has just posted the kernel source for two of its newer S4 variants, the Galaxy S4 active (i9295), and the dual-SIM version of the Galaxy S4 Mini (i9192). Samsung has been on an open source run lately with the AT&T GS4 and Galaxy Tab 8.0 going up just last week.

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If you're the developer type who really lives for this, grab the Jelly Bean code at Samsung's open source pages linked below.

12
Jun
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Developers take note: Samsung is getting some more source code out the door, but it's just one device this time. The kernel source for AT&T's version of the Galaxy S4 is out, and it's up for grabs at Samsung's open source site.

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Kernel source for a few other variants of Samsung's flagship have already been posted. In fact, this development means T-Mobile is the only major carrier whose GS4 hasn't joined the open source club.

19
Apr
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It's One launch day! You can get HTC's newest flagship on Sprint, AT&T, and T-Mobile here in the US, as well as Telus, Bell, Brightpoint, and Rogers in Canada. To go along with the official launch of the device, HTC has also decided to throw the development community a bone by releasing the kernel source code for five variants of the device: Developer Edition, Brightpoint, TELUS, Bell, and Rogers.

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Notice anything particular about that list?

27
Feb
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We've got some good news for the open source development community today: HTC has released the kernel source files for the One SV, in 16 different varieties to account for slight differences between carriers and countries.

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Although this may not be of immediate interest to consumers, as developers get their hands on the source, it should result in faster and more stable ROMs for the device in the future.

If you want to download the kernel source, which is around 100MB in size, to check it out for yourself, you can download it from the HTC Dev Center.

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