17
Sep
JBQ300px

The one and only Jean-Baptiste Queru (JBQ) has been much beloved by the Android community for his work on the Android Open Source Project at Google, where he was the technical lead. Following a dispute over missing open source drivers a few weeks ago, JBQ departed from Mountain View. Now he's announced his new position... at Yahoo.

09
Aug
SocialNexus7-24Web

It was just the other day when it came out that complications with Qualcomm licensing was keeping Google from posting the binaries and full factory image for the new Nexus 7 tablet. The issue was so irksome that Jean-Baptiste Quéru (JBQ), Google's Android open source manager, decided to leave that post. Well, that must have lit a fire under someone, because Google just posted the image and drivers for the Razor hardware.

07
Aug
greentranparentwm1

A little bit of connecting the dots has revealed that Qualcomm is the reason behind the new Nexus 7's lack of factory image / driver binary support. This has long-time AOSP maintainer Jean-Baptiste Quéru pretty upset. Upset enough that he is "quitting AOSP."

quit

It's not clear if this means JBQ is quitting his job at Google (though the fact that he even wrote this kind of suggests he may be quitting / has quit), or that he's moving to a different part of the company / Android group.

07
Aug
unnamed

Update: Looks like we were right.

ROM developers and Android tinkering enthusiasts alike have probably noticed at this point that the new iteration of the Nexus 7, unveiled two weeks ago, does not yet have factory images or driver binaries posted on the appropriate Google Developers page. A similar issue plagued the Nexus 4 in its early days, though eventually images were posted. At the time, legal issues were speculated as a possible reason for the delay, and Android build maintainer JBQ - largely responsible for the images / binaries - said only this in response: "I can't comment."

With the new Nexus 7, JBQ has not outright said that legal problems with Qualcomm are preventing the factory images (and possibly the driver binaries) from being published, but a quick look at the relevant evidence makes it pretty duh-obvious that's what's going on.

01
Mar
image

As an addendum to the announcement of Google completing AOSP rollout for Android 4.2.2, I wanted to highlight a big milestone for the Nexus program - something that has never been the case before today.

After asking JBQ (not to be confused with JDQ39) a follow-up question, I was able to get some clarity on his earlier post and confirm that as of today, with the release of Android 4.2.2 binaries, we have for the first time ever Nexus devices that have 100% of proprietary binaries available.

27
Nov
lights2
Last Updated: February 12th, 2013

Earlier today, both the Nexus 4 and the Nexus 10 started receiving small ~1MB OTAs to Android 4.2.1 with fixes to the missing month of December in the People app, among other things. The corresponding open source files are being pushed by Google to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) as we speak, Android release engineer Jean-Baptiste Queru just announced in the Android Building group.

The build number is JOP40D and the tag is android-4.2.1_r1.

09
Oct
android-logo-font
Last Updated: October 10th, 2012

Google's chief release engineer Jean-Baptiste Queru just announced via the Android Building group that version 4.1.2 of Android is being released to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) today.

The release follows Android 4.1.1, which was the final version of Jelly Bean, and is marked as minor. The build number, which we spotted in the logs yesterday, is JZO54K, while the AOSP tags are android-4.1.2_r1 and jb-mr0-release.

It's also a good time to bring up the fact that the LG Nexus prototype that we saw yesterday was also running 4.1.2.

17
Sep
150_thumb

You know the Android codenames, right? Starting with Android 1.5, they're alphabetical snacks - Cupcake, Donut, Éclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich, and Jelly Bean. But what about before 1.5? What were those called? And why did they start with C? We've got real answers from real Googlers.

Wikipedia's Android Version History is a pretty awesome article, but, as of a few days ago, it was erroneously calling 1.0 and 1.1 "Astro" and "Bender." We had never heard of this, and there wasn't a good source attached to it, so we took to G+ to set the record straight.

03
Sep
xperia_s_colour_robots
Last Updated: September 4th, 2012

In a gesture of good faith, Sony, on its developer blog, has announced the company is releasing the software binaries for the Xperia S. It has done so explicitly in support of Android developer JBQ's "experimental" support for the device in AOSP (found here). If you're unfamiliar with the project, we covered it earlier this month when it was announced.

wm_IMG_9893

The software binaries Sony released consist mainly of drivers for the hardware on the Xperia S's chipset.

17
Aug
aosp_0

The head of Google's Android Open Source Project (AOSP), Jean-Baptiste Queru, made an interesting proposal recently. He added a new device to the AOSP repository, but this is no Nexus variant. Queru created an empty git project for the Sony Xperia S, but he needs the community to get behind the initiative. This will be the first device not designed under Google's supervision to be supported under AOSP, and that could be a big deal.

Page 1 of 212
Quantcast