01
Jul
NexusCSS-Thumb

The Nexus 4 below was created without using any external images. Okay, the one below is actually just a screenshot of a Nexus 4 designed entirely using CSS and JavaScript, but the real deal is hosted over at CodePen. The smartphone is somewhat interactive - you don't have access to the home screen or the Play Store, but you can play around with the dialer. The tabs can be switched, even though they don't lead to anything for the time being.

03
Apr
chromiumtiny

Man, WebKit cannot catch a break today, can it? After Samsung announced that it would be teaming up with Mozilla to build their own mobile browser engine called Servo, Google says its planning to fork WebKit to create a new project called Blink. Unlike Servo, this one will still be based on WebKit, but this new fork actually seems to be aimed not at competing with whatever Samsung is putting out, but rather at gaining freedom from another browser: Safari.

05
Jun
landingPage
Last Updated: August 22nd, 2012

A key aspect of the power of smartphones is the variety of functions they provide to the user. Data, GPS, Voice, Video, are all found in almost every Android phone on the market. With today's release of on{X} ("on-ex"), Microsoft hopes to exploit this convergence of functionality in a way that is less reliant on the user for input and more aware of its surroundings. By gathering information from the host of sensors available to the operating system, it's quite possible for your phone to determine its location and context and respond accordingly, without intervention by the user.

07
Feb
2012-02-07 13h29_16
Last Updated: February 15th, 2012

You're already a web developer, master of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. You have a great idea for an Android App, but your particular skill set doesn't help you create that app. Or does it? O'Reilly media just released a 176-page 2nd edition of "Building Android Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript" by Jonathan Stark and Brian Jepson that explains how to do just that.

This contest is now over.

14
Jul
hi-256-0-76110b2df8c8745c9bf597974d12ec116acfc823

It's a well-known fact that Android enthusiasts love benchmarks. When new devices hit our hands, what is one of the first things we do? Run benchmarks. It's how we compare devices to one another, and what we use to develop the standards on which future devices will be set. At this point, we use a set of benchmarking tools that have become clutch throughout the community: Quadrant, Linpack, SmartBench, etc.

Now, Qualcomm is getting into the benchmarking game with a new web benchmark called Vellamo that aims to judge device performance in areas that really matter: rendering, javascript, networking, and user experience.

29
Jan
image

Last year, we reported on a serious vulnerability in all versions of Android, found by a security researcher Thomas Cannon. It allowed a remote attacker to download files off a user's SD card upon visiting a webpage with malicious JavaScript code embedded in it. Google's response was swift, and the fix was rolled out in the public release of Gingerbread at the end of 2010.

A new report from eWeek came out today stating that another researcher, Xuxian Jiang, this time from North Carolina State University, stepped forward with a tweak to the very same vulnerability Google reportedly patched.

23
Nov
image

A new vulnerability that affects every Android device currently on the market was discovered and published today by Thomas Cannon, an information and security researcher. The hole in the way the Android browser treats Javascript allows a remote attacker to lure an unsuspecting victim to a malicious web page, which then downloads and executes rogue Javascript with access to the local SD card's file system. While the locations of files on the SD card needs to be known by the attacker in advance, it still represents a clear problem due to many popular applications storing data in the same location.

07
Jul
image

It’s rather surprising this comparison took such a long time to take place, but nonetheless, ArsTechnica published the image below comparing the performance of Android 2.2’s web browser against iOS4’s mobile Safari in two respected JavaScript benchmarks.

ios_v_android-thumb-640xauto-15275

SunSpider

The SunSpider JavaScript benchmark measures the amount of time a certain number of various JavaScript operations take to complete. A lower score means the operations completed more quickly, and the Nexus One running Froyo beats the iPhone 4 in this regard by a sizeable ~50%.