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Google Keyboard

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Google Keyboard v5.1 (originally bundled with N preview) is rolling out in the Play Store [APK Download] [Update: Changelog]

Google gave us a little sneak preview of Google Keyboard v5.1 in the Android N dev preview back in May. You could sideload that APK on other versions of Android to get the new themes, but now the final build appears to be hitting the Play Store. As with all Google releases, this one is staged. We've got the new version available for sideloading, though.

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[Update: Japanese keyboard too] Many language-specific Google keyboards get Nougat support, theme support, and more


The English alphabet only includes 26 different letters, but for many other languages that are not descendant from Latin, the number of valid characters is much larger. It turns out that this can make creating a keyboard that works well in those languages a bit difficult — imagine having a keyboard with hundreds or thousands of keys and you begin to get the picture. That's why Google has developed dedicated keyboard apps with alternative input methods specifically designed for languages such as Pinyin or Cantonese to make is easier for many (or maybe even most) users around the world to type in their native tongue.

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[Impressive] Chrooma Keyboard 3.0 adds gestures, themes and adaptive colors, Google Now integration, an action bar, more

Whoa. It's not easy for me to be impressed by a keyboard. I have been a staunch Google Keyboard user on all of my devices from the day it was released as a standalone app on the Play Store many moons ago. Every other keyboard I have tried — and I've tried plenty — fails to even register within the usable spectrum for me: lags and/or lack of precision have killed many revered third-party options.

I confess, I'd never tried Chrooma before today, mainly because I'd given up on finding any third-party keyboard, regardless of how many cool options it has, that lets me type as efficiently and comfortably as Google Keyboard has.

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Android N Preview 3 Brings Google Keyboard 5.1: Themes And Emojis Abound [APK Download]

Earlier this month, Google updated the Google Keyboard to version 5.0 with plenty of new gestures, optional borders, one-handed mode, and more features. However, version 5.0 was not compatible with Android N, so those running the Preview couldn't benefit from it.

This is now fixed with Android N's third Preview. The new image includes Google Keyboard 5.1 that not only brings all of the same changes, but also adds two new cool features: themes and all those new emojis we were promised with Android N. Unfortunately, there's no sign of that iOS GBoard action. Oh bugger.

Keyboard Themes

Google Keyboard 5.1 includes a new setting section for themes.

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Google Keyboard Gets A Huge Update To v5.0 With One-Handed Mode, Optional Key Borders, New Gestures, And More [APK Download]

Keyboard apps aren't the most exciting things, but they're one of the apps you interact with most on your phone. Think about how much you type, and how much that experience has improved over the years. Google hasn't added anything important to the Google Keyboard lately, but apparently they've been saving it up. The new v5.0 update is rolling out, and it's huge. There are UI tweaks, new gestures, layout changes, and so much more.

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Google Keyboard Updated To v4.1 With Personal Dictionary Sync, Emoji Access From Physical Keyboards, And More [APK Download]

The Google Keyboard has been updated to v4.1, and it brings a few handy new features. At the same time, several options have been removed. Google giveth and Google taketh away. One of the additions is cross-device dictionary sync, so maybe you can forgive Google on this one.

2015-06-03 20.47.35 2015-06-03 20.47.46 2015-06-03 21.13.30

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[Android M Feature Spotlight] The Stock Keyboard Now Has A Split-Screen Mode On Larger Devices

There are features both big and small found in Android M, and most still seem to be pretty useful all around. This one is a somewhat small feature found in M, but that doesn't take away from how massively helpful it actually is - especially for those who type on their tablet often.

Screenshot_20150529-012842

Thanks for the screenshot, Duncan Adkins.

The stock keyboard in the M build now features a split-screen mode that shifts the keys off to either side, at least when the device is in landscape mode. This instantly makes thumb typing a lot easier, and something that probably should've been included all along.

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Google Keyboard 4.0 Is Rolling Out With Material Themes And The Return Of Configurable Long-Press Delay [APK Download]

It's update Wednesday, and you know what that means. Well, yeah... updates. I guess it's sort of in the name. But at any rate, lately that specifically means material themes are coming to all your favorite Google apps. Today the new version of Google Keyboard is available to all in the Play Store. Or rather, it will be soon. You don't have to wait for it to reach your account, though. We've got the APK below.

2014-11-12 17.07.15 2014-11-12 17.07.40 2014-11-12 17.07.29

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[Smile, Santa] Google Resolves Issue #41827, The Most Jarring Issue In The Android Bug Tracker For The Past Two Years

Yesterday we reported on the appearance of several redesigned emoji in the keyboard Google's rolling out with Android 5.0. In the piece, I concentrated on the improved consistency brought in by the tweaks. As it turns out, there was one more change hidden in plain sight among the others, and its importance shadows all others. Google has quietly addressed a bug report that has lingered for years.

Let's take a look at the issue at hand here. These are two of the images included in yesterday's post. On the left, we have the old set of emoji. On the right, we have the new ones included with Lollipop's version of Google Keyboard.

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[Lollipop Feature Spotlight] Google Keyboard Comes With Various New, Redesigned Emoji

In Android 5.0, the default keyboard looks substantially different from how it has looked largely since the days of Ice Cream Sandwich. The new out-of-the-box method of typing comes with a flatter theme that supplies a stark new feel. At the end of the day, though, it's still used primary to punch in letters onto the screen, and there's nothing particularly exciting to share there. One change we would like to highlight though is the addition of new emoji.

Google hasn't completely redone the full collection of smiley faces and other icons, but it has taken this time to alter some of its previous work.

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