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Articles Tagged:

fine

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T-Mobile to pay $7.5 million fine and other penalties to the FCC for 'unlimited data' disclosure problems

There's no such thing as real unlimited anymore. T-Mobile's "unlimited data" marketing isn't all that quick to point out that it comes with some built-in limits - specifically, throttling the top three percent of unlimited data users along with more general users who exceeded 17GB a month. The Federal Communications Commission took exception to some of those commercials and advertisements after several consumer complaints. T-Mobile's settlement with the Commission means they'll have to pay up, to the tune of several million dollars.

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The FCC Plans To Fine AT&T Mobility $100 Million For Misleading 'Unlimited' Data Plans

It's been almost eight months since the Federal Communications Commission opened its lawsuit against AT&T for misleading statements on its "unlimited" data plans. Today the Commission announced its intention (PDF link) to fine the wireless company $100 million for failing to notify its customers that going over unspecified data limits on an "unlimited" plan would result in severely reduced or "throttled" speed, well below advertised speeds, violating the 2010 Open Internet Transparency Rule. "Unlimited means Unlimited," said FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief Travis LeBlanc.

The Federal Communications Commission plans to fine AT&T Mobility, LLC $100,000,000 for misleading its customers about unlimited mobile data plans.

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Report: The FCC Will Fine Sprint $105 Million For Overcharging Customers For Unwanted Text Messages

If you're an American wireless provider founded in 1978, here's your horoscope for today: avoid US regulatory agencies, customers whom you've charged for text messages without asking, and burly-looking men with open burlap sacks and insistent expressions. The Wall Street Journal reports that the Federal Communications Commission intends to fine Sprint $105 million in punishment for sending unwanted text messages to its customers, then sticking them with the bill.

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The report says that the FCC is focusing on a three-month window in the fall of last year, during which the Commission received over 35,000 complaints from Sprint customers. The unwanted text messages included the usual carrier "alerts," ringtones, sports information, and even horoscopes, which the FCC says Sprint knowingly and willfully sent to customers with the intent to "cram" them with extra charges.

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Verizon Settles With The FCC On A $7.4 Million Fine For Marketing That Violated Customer Privacy

Update, 9-4-13: a Verizon Wireless spokesman reached out to say that the wireless provider hasn't been fined by the FCC, and that the landline services provider (providers of home Internet and cable services) is the one being fined. Verizon and Verizon Wireless are technically separate companies. The headline and story text have been altered to reflect this.

There are a lot of good reasons not to like Verizon. But the Federal Communications Commission has taken particular exception to at least one of Verizon's practices from way back in 2006. In a post on the Commission's website, a press release details how the FCC Enforcement Bureau investigated an incident in which Verizon may have used some customer's personal information to market extra services to them, without informing said customers of their right to opt out of the data collection.

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£50k Fine Slapped On Firm Responsible For Fake Angry Birds And Other Play Store Games That Sent Premium SMS Messages

Fake apps in the Play Store are nothing new. We've seen countless fakes hit the Store, many of which contained some form of malware used to steal user data, or worse, charge premium features to their bill. A Latvian firm is now being fined for the latter due to fake apps designed to look like Angry Birds Space, Cut the Rope, and Assassin's Creed.

After downloading one of the aforementioned apps, though, the user wasn't greeted by flying birds or a hungry frog, but instead... nothing. The apps did absolutely nothing in the foreground. Little did the users who installed these apps know that they were being scammed behind the scenes.

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Google's 15-Minute App Return Window Unlawful In Taiwan, Google Pulls Paid Apps In Response

Well, this is an interesting turn of events for the Android Market's universally-despised 15-minute app return window. According to the Taipei Times, the Taipei City Government was recently alerted to Google's Android Market return policies - policies that violate Taiwanese consumer protection laws requiring any product bought over the internet to have at least a 7-day "trial period."

Earlier this month, the Taiwanese government gave Google a 15-day ultimatum to revise its app return policies to include the mandatory 7-day trial period, but Google refused to comply. Faced with a $1 million fine for non-compliance, Google, after negotiations with the government broke down, decided yesterday to remove all access to paid apps for Android devices in Taiwan.

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