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Articles Tagged:

find my phone

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The single best reason to buy a Google Home Mini? $50 for a permanent "find my phone" button

Google Home Mini is exactly what I think most of us were hoping for in a smaller Google Home (check out our review here). But the more I consider it, there's one new Google Home feature that is going to make this little speaker indispensible to me: it can find my phone, even in silent mode.

Think about it. If a company were to market a device with the sole purpose of finding your phone just by touching a button, sitting permanently plugged into your wall, you'd probably be a little intrigued. How much would you pay for such a gadget?

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[Update: Live] Google Home can now help find your phone, even if it's on silent

Where is your phone right now? Is it in your pocket, on the coffee table, or has it slipped in between the couch cushions? You won't have to wonder about where your phone has gotten to anymore, as long as there's a Google Home nearby. Google is adding a feature to find your phone with a voice command, even if the phone is on silent.

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[Update: Changelog] Android Device Manager updated for the first time in two years and renamed to Find My Device [APK Download]

In the first update the app has seen since 2015, Android Device Manager has been bumped to V2, bringing some much needed visual changes and a new name. Be pleased to make your first introduction to Find My Device. We have an updated APK that shows the app has been redesigned and given a new name: Find My Device. The new version offers all the same features but updates the interface a bit to remove the last dregs of Holo.

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Type 'Find My Phone' Into Google On Your Computer And Immediately Locate Your Android Phone

Google is a digital genie. You type your wishes into a search bar and -POW- there it is, what you are looking for. Now you can even use Google to find tangible objects, as long as the object you are looking for is your Android phone. Just type the words 'find my phone' into any google search bar from your computer and in seconds Google will locate your device on a map and give you the option to make it ring. Nifty.

Screenshot 2015-04-15 at 5.17.10 PM - Edited

Android users have been able to find their devices remotely for a while now, but until today you had to log into Android Device Manager on another mobile device or your computer to start your search.

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Android Device Manager App Gains Android Wear Support With 'Find My Phone' Feature

When your watch and your phone are connected, the ability for one to find the other seems like a natural feature to add. Oddly, Android Wear hasn't been able to do that so far, at least not without third-party apps adding it in. Google is correcting this oversight today with a new update to the Android Device Manager system. With ADM installed on your phone, you can issue an "OK Google, find my phone" voice command to your Wear device to make it ring out like a mildly annoyed baby.

Find your phone with Android Wear

Well, you'll be able to eventually. Apparently this feature isn't available to everyone yet - it looks like it's one of the "silent" back-end updates on Google's end of the system, popping up without an update to either Android Wear's firmware or the ADM app itself.

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[Updated] Verizon Launches Mobile Security App Powered By Asurion And McAfee, With Suspiciously High 4.7 Star Rating

This morning, Verizon announced it was launching a brand-new mobile security app for Android. It's called Verizon Mobile Security. Catchy, right?

Fact aside that like most mobile security apps the "malware and virus protection" feature is basically worthless unless you're visiting Chinese / Russian warez sites on a regular basis, this app does bring one thing of value to the table: remote track and wipe (for $2 extra a month, $1 a month if you have a Verizon Equipment Protection plan). Which, it's fair to note, Avast will give you for free, with an app that does other useful stuff.

And that doesn't look like this:

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But, if you're an unwitting Verizon subscriber, there's a good chance you might be interested in this, if only because Verizon puts it out.

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