15
Oct
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The moment we've all been waiting for is finally here. A few hours ago, the full version of the most anticipated Android game ever, Angry Birds, has hit the Android Mar... errrr... GetJar Market, exclusively. Instead of uploading to the official Market first, Rovio decided to go for an alternative market called GetJar, probably in a deal to promote it. The Market version is promised "soon," which would be good right about now, as GetJar apparently wasn't prepared for the influx of visitors and promptly crashed for a couple of hours.

14
Oct
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Last week, I had to deliver disappointing news about the full version of Angry Birds, the most addicting game on Android, getting delayed till this week, mostly due to proper multi-tasking support. Today, I'm glad to report that not only did Rovio commit to a Friday (tomorrow) release, as evident from the screenshot below, but also sent us a full version to play with.

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Unfortunately, I didn't have the time to shoot a video review, but I did, however, collect some interesting screenshots together with all the info you need to know, presented in my most favorite bullet point style:

  • the version that was sent to us contains ads (see screenshot #7 below) which shows up from time to time, I'd say about once per level
  • in our email exchange, the company also hinted at an interesting distribution model, which they didn't disclose.
23
Sep
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SwiftKey Keyboard has been in beta ever since its introduction to the Android Market a few months ago. Having tried Swype, I also jumped on SwiftKey to give it a fair shot and ended up sticking with it. Yes, it was that good.

SwiftKey is different from other keyboards because it uses predictive recognition based on both tons of statistical information and your own typing habits. In fact, you can make whole sentences without typing a single key and just picking default suggestions.

19
Sep
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Last Updated: August 1st, 2012

CyanogenMod 6 is one of the most popular Android custom ROMs, and for a good reason - besides supporting a myriad of devices, it is built from AOSP (Android Open Source Project), which means no extra garbage that normally comes installed by carriers and customizations/improvements for the people, by the people (the CM contributor community is huge).

Sprint has abandoned our beloved HTC Hero (it was my first Android device a bit under a year ago now and holds a special place in my heart) but the Android community hasn't.

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