21
Mar
currentstiny

Yesterday, Google added support for audio playlists and media controls to Google Currents. We thought this sounded like a pretty neat feature, and, hey! We're on Google Currents! So why not put two and two together? Today we updated our Currents edition to include a feed of our audio podcast and it's actually kind of beautiful. Take a look:

2013-03-21 13.56.32 2013-03-21 13.56.44 2013-03-21 13.56.57

It was possible to add audio before, but it wasn't quite this nice.

19
Mar
neatlytiny

Last month, we talked about a new Twitter client called Neatly that promised to do what the social network won't do itself: provide a more intelligent and less thorough approach to your feed. Twitter opts to list every tweet for people you follow in chronological order, which has helped with the up-to-the-minute identity the company builds for itself. Neatly chooses, instead, to filter by the most important updates, and allows you to filter by topics.

14
Mar
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Update: It's official. Samsung Just Officially Unveiled 'The Next Big Thing' – Come Meet The Galaxy S4!

The next Galaxy's unveiling is finally upon us at 7PM Eastern/4PM Pacific tonight, March 14th. Come back to this page a few minutes early to watch the event stream live as well as follow our live blog. Don't forget to bring a snack - it'll likely go for well over an hour.

We may have already discovered some of the features and a possible look of the S IV, but there's always a chance that the leaks we've been seeing, which all came from the same dual-SIM device in China, aren't actually representative of the final hardware.

13
Mar
reader

"We're living in a new kind of computing environment," says Urs Hölzle, SVP Technical Infrastructure and Google Fellow in a new post to Google's official blog. The search giant has resolved to make a second sweep at spring cleaning that began two years ago. After this round of cleaning is complete, the total number of features and services Google will have closed will number 70.

In the post, Google announces the closure or deprecation of eight features and services, but buried four items deep is the one that will probably affect the most users: Google Reader.

18
May
hojokitiny

The world of the future has some pretty great products to keep productive. Things like Google Calendar, Dropbox, Evernote, and a myriad of other services all aim to make our lives easier and more cloud-centric. Trouble is that these services are all separate. When a group you're working with adds a new event to a Google Calendar, adds some relevant files to Dropbox, and scribbles some notes in Evernote, that's three different sites you need to track.

16
Feb
unnamed (3)

Looking to "help you catch up on technology news in minimal time and on your own schedule," Briox introduced Riversip to the Android Market recently. Riversip without a doubt provides a unique take on the "news reader" concept, automatically choosing news sources based on user-chosen topics, and showing only the top headlines, instead of clogging up your screen with every headline available.

 

Riversip also makes a point of its incredibly easy user experience, promising that "no setup or learning time [is] required." The app also allows users to see what other sources have reported on a given topic, providing a multitude of different angles for each headline.

24
May
hi-256-0-ef01dd7614358cd3795cdff8086b50eb0b9548ac

If you're into accurate, concise, well organized news stories and you have a Honeycomb tablet, then News360 is the app for you. It brings over 1500 news sources into one stream, neatly organized into appropriate categories. You can select which companies, people, providers, and locations to include in your feed, so you only see the news that interests you.

ss-0-320-480-160-0-b8cbc4e07a71c08a69d027d8f18699587363e9c8 ss-2-320-480-160-0-3a154c7091df7851799f2fbd8d4680823a5e1b16 ss-4-320-480-160-0-85d3556f37ba33a4b85e6e1e4f9565a1a556c52c

News360 gathers information from your cloud (with your permission, of course) - Facebook, Twitter, Evernote, Google Reader, etc.

23
Apr
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Last Updated: April 24th, 2011

While browsing the XOOM xda forum today, I saw this announcement of HoneyReader, a new application built specifically with Honeycomb tablets in mind. Because it doesn't have to support pre-Honeycomb versions of the OS or small-sized phone screens altogether, the authors concentrated on making it a great tablet experience, and I must say, their first take is pretty good.

HoneyReader uses the native to Honeycomb Fragments API that on the surface translates to fluid and flexible UI elements that can divide the screen into separately scrollable independent areas with their own lifecycles.

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